Voluntary and automatic visual spatial shifts of attention in Parkinson's disease: an analysis of costs and benefits

Pollux, Petra M. J. and Robertson, Colin (2001) Voluntary and automatic visual spatial shifts of attention in Parkinson's disease: an analysis of costs and benefits. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 23 (5). pp. 662-670. ISSN 1744-411x

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1076/jcen.23.5.662.1238

Abstract

Visual spatial shifts of attention were investigated in 13 patients suffering from Parkinson's disease and 20 control subjects. Attention was directed towards a target location with peripheral or central cues at varying SOAs in two separate experiments. A benefit and cost analysis was conducted on reaction times. The results of the central cueing task showed that in comparison with control subjects, costs of invalid cueing were reduced in patients. Results of the peripheral cueing task revealed that although the cueing effect (validin valid) was similar for patients and controls, the effect of valid cueing (neutral valid) was greater in patients. The effects observed in both tasks were explained as an impaired ability of patients with Parkinsons disease to maintain attention.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Visual spatial shifts of attention were investigated in 13 patients suffering from Parkinson's disease and 20 control subjects. Attention was directed towards a target location with peripheral or central cues at varying SOAs in two separate experiments. A benefit and cost analysis was conducted on reaction times. The results of the central cueing task showed that in comparison with control subjects, costs of invalid cueing were reduced in patients. Results of the peripheral cueing task revealed that although the cueing effect (validin valid) was similar for patients and controls, the effect of valid cueing (neutral valid) was greater in patients. The effects observed in both tasks were explained as an impaired ability of patients with Parkinsons disease to maintain attention.
Keywords:Parkinson's disease, Attention
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C840 Clinical Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:736
Deposited By: Jill Partridge
Deposited On:25 Jun 2007
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 08:23

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