The Ten Essential Shared Capabilities: their development and application

Baguley, Ian and Basset, Thurstine and Lindley, Peter (2007) The Ten Essential Shared Capabilities: their development and application. In: Teaching Mental Health. John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, pp. 89-103. ISBN 9780470030295

Documents
uoa12ib04.pdf
[img]
[Download]
[img] PDF
uoa12ib04.pdf - Whole Document
Restricted to Repository staff only

145Kb

Abstract

In this chapter, we explore how the Ten Essential Shared Capabilities were developed and
their initial application in practice as part of the training and education of mental health
workers.
Early in the 21st Century we find ourselves in the position whereby it is widely acknowledged
that education and training for mental health practice has not kept pace with
contemporary service models or the changing needs of service users and carers. There continue
to be serious concerns about the utility, relevance and effectiveness of much of our
current education and training provision. Although it has long been recognised that there are
distinct advantages in multidisciplinary and shared training, much of the coordination and
delivery of programmes remains fragmented and uni-disciplinary. Differences between the
professional roles of mental health practitioners are difficult to define and the role of nurses
and social workers covers much of the same ground. In addition a number of new roles
have been created and there are increasing numbers of mental health workers who do not
belong to the established professions. Their training and education, whilst generally more
modern in its approach, has grown in a very piecemeal way and presents as an interesting,
lively but somewhat un-coordinated patchwork of vocational and academic qualifications.

Item Type:Book Section
Additional Information:In this chapter, we explore how the Ten Essential Shared Capabilities were developed and their initial application in practice as part of the training and education of mental health workers. Early in the 21st Century we find ourselves in the position whereby it is widely acknowledged that education and training for mental health practice has not kept pace with contemporary service models or the changing needs of service users and carers. There continue to be serious concerns about the utility, relevance and effectiveness of much of our current education and training provision. Although it has long been recognised that there are distinct advantages in multidisciplinary and shared training, much of the coordination and delivery of programmes remains fragmented and uni-disciplinary. Differences between the professional roles of mental health practitioners are difficult to define and the role of nurses and social workers covers much of the same ground. In addition a number of new roles have been created and there are increasing numbers of mental health workers who do not belong to the established professions. Their training and education, whilst generally more modern in its approach, has grown in a very piecemeal way and presents as an interesting, lively but somewhat un-coordinated patchwork of vocational and academic qualifications.
Keywords:Essential shared capabilities, Mental health care, Evaluation, Pilot, Learning materials
Subjects:B Subjects allied to Medicine > B760 Mental Health Nursing
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
ID Code:730
Deposited By: Bev Jones
Deposited On:03 May 2007
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 08:23

Repository Staff Only: item control page