A genome-wide perspective on the evolutionary history of enigmatic wolf-like canids

vonHoldt, Bridgett M. and Pollinger, John P. and Earl, Dent A. and Knowles, James C. and Boyko, Adam R. and Parker, Heidi and Geffen, Eli and Pilot, Malgorzata and Jedrzejewski, Wlodzimierz and Jedrzejewski, Bogumila and Sidorovich, Vadim and Greco, Claudio and Randi, Ettore and Musiani, Marco and Kays, Roland and Bustamante, Carlos D. and Ostrander, Elaine A. and Novembre, John and Wayne, Robert K. (2011) A genome-wide perspective on the evolutionary history of enigmatic wolf-like canids. Genome Research, 21 (8). pp. 1294-1305. ISSN 1088-9051

Full content URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/gr.116301.110

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Abstract

High-throughput genotyping technologies developed for model species can potentially increase the resolution of demographic history and ancestry in wild relatives. We use a SNP genotyping microarray developed for the domestic dog to
assay variation in over 48K loci in wolf-like species worldwide. Despite the high mobility of these large carnivores, we find distinct hierarchical population units within gray wolves and coyotes that correspond with geographic and ecologic differences among populations. Further, we test controversial theories about the ancestry of the Great Lakes wolf and red wolf using an analysis of haplotype blocks across all 38 canid autosomes. We find that these enigmatic canids are highly admixed varieties derived from gray wolves and coyotes, respectively. This divergent genomic history suggests that they do not have a shared recent ancestry as proposed by previous researchers. Interspecific hybridization, as well as the process of evolutionary divergence, may be responsible for the observed phenotypic distinction of both forms. Such admixture complicates decisions regarding endangered species restoration and protection.

Additional Information:High-throughput genotyping technologies developed for model species can potentially increase the resolution of demographic history and ancestry in wild relatives. We use a SNP genotyping microarray developed for the domestic dog to assay variation in over 48K loci in wolf-like species worldwide. Despite the high mobility of these large carnivores, we find distinct hierarchical population units within gray wolves and coyotes that correspond with geographic and ecologic differences among populations. Further, we test controversial theories about the ancestry of the Great Lakes wolf and red wolf using an analysis of haplotype blocks across all 38 canid autosomes. We find that these enigmatic canids are highly admixed varieties derived from gray wolves and coyotes, respectively. This divergent genomic history suggests that they do not have a shared recent ancestry as proposed by previous researchers. Interspecific hybridization, as well as the process of evolutionary divergence, may be responsible for the observed phenotypic distinction of both forms. Such admixture complicates decisions regarding endangered species restoration and protection.
Keywords:Genetic differentiation, Wolf-like canids, Hybridisation, Genome-wise SNP analysis
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C182 Evolution
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
ID Code:7263
Deposited On:15 Jan 2013 12:28

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