Two-week joint mobilization intervention improves self-reported function, range of motion, and dynamic balance in those with chronic ankle instability

Hoch, Matthew C. and Andreatta, Richard D. and Mullineaux, David and English, Robert A. and McKeon, Jennifer M. Medina and Mattacola , Carl G. and McKeon, Patrick O. (2012) Two-week joint mobilization intervention improves self-reported function, range of motion, and dynamic balance in those with chronic ankle instability. Journal of Orthopaedic Research, 30 (11). pp. 1798-1804. ISSN 0736-0266

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Two-week joint mobilization intervention improves self-reported function, range of motion, and dynamic balance in those with chronic ankle instability
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Full text URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jor.22150

Abstract

We examined the effect of a 2-week anterior-to-posterior ankle joint mobilization intervention on weight-bearing dorsiflexion
range of motion (ROM), dynamic balance, and self-reported function in subjects with chronic ankle instability (CAI). In this prospective
cohort study, subjects received six Maitland Grade III anterior-to-posterior joint mobilization treatments over 2 weeks. Weightbearing
dorsiflexion ROM, the anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral reach directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT),
and self-reported function on the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) were assessed 1 week before the intervention (baseline),
prior to the first treatment (pre-intervention), 24–48 h following the final treatment (post-intervention), and 1 week later (1-week
follow-up) in 12 adults (6 males and 6 females) with CAI. The results indicate that dorsiflexion ROM, reach distance in all directions of
the SEBT, and the FAAM improved (p < 0.05 for all) in all measures following the intervention compared to those prior to the intervention.
No differences were observed in any assessments between the baseline and pre-intervention measures or between the postintervention
and 1-week follow-up measures (p > 0.05). These results indicate that the joint mobilization intervention that targeted
posterior talar glide was able to improve measures of function in adults with CAI for at least 1 week.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:We examined the effect of a 2-week anterior-to-posterior ankle joint mobilization intervention on weight-bearing dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM), dynamic balance, and self-reported function in subjects with chronic ankle instability (CAI). In this prospective cohort study, subjects received six Maitland Grade III anterior-to-posterior joint mobilization treatments over 2 weeks. Weightbearing dorsiflexion ROM, the anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral reach directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), and self-reported function on the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) were assessed 1 week before the intervention (baseline), prior to the first treatment (pre-intervention), 24–48 h following the final treatment (post-intervention), and 1 week later (1-week follow-up) in 12 adults (6 males and 6 females) with CAI. The results indicate that dorsiflexion ROM, reach distance in all directions of the SEBT, and the FAAM improved (p < 0.05 for all) in all measures following the intervention compared to those prior to the intervention. No differences were observed in any assessments between the baseline and pre-intervention measures or between the postintervention and 1-week follow-up measures (p > 0.05). These results indicate that the joint mobilization intervention that targeted posterior talar glide was able to improve measures of function in adults with CAI for at least 1 week.
Keywords:ankle sprain, dorsiflexion, balance, manual therapy, self-reported function
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C600 Sports Science
B Subjects allied to Medicine > B120 Physiology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Sport and Exercise Science
ID Code:7031
Deposited By: Alison Wilson
Deposited On:06 Dec 2012 21:33
Last Modified:05 Dec 2013 10:35

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