The benefits of volunteering for psychology students

Bromnick, Rachel and Horowitz, Ava and Shepherd, Daniel (2012) The benefits of volunteering for psychology students. Psychology Teaching Review, 18 (2). pp. 47-51. ISSN 0965-948X

Documents
The benefits of volunteering for psychology students
[img]
[Download]
Request a copy
[img] PDF
Bromnick.pdf - Whole Document
Restricted to Repository staff only

71Kb

Abstract

Within the current economic climate students are seen as needing more than a degree to succeed in securing
graduate employment. One way that students chose to enhance their employability is through engaging in
voluntary work. In this empirical study, undergraduate psychology students’ reasons for volunteering are
explored within the context of enhanced employability. Thirty-nine students provided written narrative
accounts of their reasons for undertaking voluntary work. Responses were analysed together to identify key
themes and subthemes. The main finding from this analysis was the large degree of cluster overlap within
individual participants’ responses between self and other focused motives, allowing for a model of strongly
interdependent motives to emerge. Students clearly benefitted from both volunteering and the opportunity to
reflect on their experiences. The findings are discussed in terms of their value for promoting volunteering for
psychology students, in and beyond the context of employability.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Within the current economic climate students are seen as needing more than a degree to succeed in securing graduate employment. One way that students chose to enhance their employability is through engaging in voluntary work. In this empirical study, undergraduate psychology students’ reasons for volunteering are explored within the context of enhanced employability. Thirty-nine students provided written narrative accounts of their reasons for undertaking voluntary work. Responses were analysed together to identify key themes and subthemes. The main finding from this analysis was the large degree of cluster overlap within individual participants’ responses between self and other focused motives, allowing for a model of strongly interdependent motives to emerge. Students clearly benefitted from both volunteering and the opportunity to reflect on their experiences. The findings are discussed in terms of their value for promoting volunteering for psychology students, in and beyond the context of employability.
Keywords:Employability, volunteering, psychology, content analysis, reflective practice
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C812 Educational Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:7023
Deposited By: Alison Wilson
Deposited On:06 Dec 2012 21:08
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:20

Repository Staff Only: item control page