Experimental methods in health research

Siriwardena, A. Niroshan (2012) Experimental methods in health research. In: Researching health: qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods [2nd ed.]. Sage, London, pp. 263-279. ISBN 9781446252277

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Experimental methods in health research
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Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of non-randomized experimental and quasi-experimental methods particularly focusing on experimental techniques that provide alternatives to the randomized controlled trial (RCT) described in the previous chapter. The RCT is a particular form of experimental method, and in a double-blind controlled trial that ranks highest in the hierarchy of evidence described in Chapter 3, randomization can control for confounding variables and double blinding can reduce certain types of bias. However, it is not always possible to conduct a RCT for methodological, practical or ethical reasons that are discussed below. Experimental methods form an umbrella term that includes a variety of techniques which aim to maintain scientific rigour in situations where it is not possible to introduce randomization, blinding or sometimes even controls. The chapter will explain the language of experimentation and discuss the advantages and disadvantages, as well as how such methods should be applied. A range of experimental research designs based on published or unpublished studies are described to illustrate the use of this method in practice.

Item Type:Book Section
Additional Information:This chapter provides an overview of non-randomized experimental and quasi-experimental methods particularly focusing on experimental techniques that provide alternatives to the randomized controlled trial (RCT) described in the previous chapter. The RCT is a particular form of experimental method, and in a double-blind controlled trial that ranks highest in the hierarchy of evidence described in Chapter 3, randomization can control for confounding variables and double blinding can reduce certain types of bias. However, it is not always possible to conduct a RCT for methodological, practical or ethical reasons that are discussed below. Experimental methods form an umbrella term that includes a variety of techniques which aim to maintain scientific rigour in situations where it is not possible to introduce randomization, blinding or sometimes even controls. The chapter will explain the language of experimentation and discuss the advantages and disadvantages, as well as how such methods should be applied. A range of experimental research designs based on published or unpublished studies are described to illustrate the use of this method in practice.
Keywords:experimental methods, health research
Subjects:B Subjects allied to Medicine > B710 Community Nursing
A Medicine and Dentistry > A300 Clinical Medicine
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
ID Code:7001
Deposited By: Niro Siriwardena
Deposited On:01 Dec 2012 08:39
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:20

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