EU enlargement and the effectiveness of conditionality: keeping to the deal?

Barnes, Ian and Randerson, Claire (2006) EU enlargement and the effectiveness of conditionality: keeping to the deal? Managerial Law, 48 (4). pp. 351-365. ISSN 0309-0558

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/03090550610681196

Abstract

Purpose – Accession to the European Union is one of the most powerful foreign policy tools exercised within the European arena and enlargement negotiations have been a major stimulus to reform in Central and Eastern Europe. Conditionality has evolved as over time into a dynamic instrument used to ensure that new members are sufficiently prepared to take on the responsibilities of EU membership, whilst also satisfying existing member states that new members will not prove too burdensome. This paper aims to examine some of the lessons learnt from the first stage of the Fifth Enlargement and the stricter use of conditionality mechanisms for Romania, Bulgaria and beyond.
Design/methodology/approach – The article is based on interviews with EU officials involved in the enlargement process.
Findings – The article finds that the use of conditionality in the 2004 enlargement has had a far from uniform effect on candidates and policy areas and that the commission has learnt much from this experience. The integration of Bulgaria and Romania will offer more significant challenges and conditionality has evolved as a mechanism to address these.
Originality/value – The article offersboth an empirical as well as theoretical evaluation of the use of conditionality in the context of the EU enlargement process.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Purpose – Accession to the European Union is one of the most powerful foreign policy tools exercised within the European arena and enlargement negotiations have been a major stimulus to reform in Central and Eastern Europe. Conditionality has evolved as over time into a dynamic instrument used to ensure that new members are sufficiently prepared to take on the responsibilities of EU membership, whilst also satisfying existing member states that new members will not prove too burdensome. This paper aims to examine some of the lessons learnt from the first stage of the Fifth Enlargement and the stricter use of conditionality mechanisms for Romania, Bulgaria and beyond. Design/methodology/approach – The article is based on interviews with EU officials involved in the enlargement process. Findings – The article finds that the use of conditionality in the 2004 enlargement has had a far from uniform effect on candidates and policy areas and that the commission has learnt much from this experience. The integration of Bulgaria and Romania will offer more significant challenges and conditionality has evolved as a mechanism to address these. Originality/value – The article offersboth an empirical as well as theoretical evaluation of the use of conditionality in the context of the EU enlargement process.
Keywords:Bulgaria, European Union, Foreign relations, Romania, Enlargement of European Union
Subjects:L Social studies > L241 European Union Politics
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Social & Political Sciences
ID Code:700
Deposited By: Bev Jones
Deposited On:22 Jun 2007
Last Modified:18 Jul 2011 16:13

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