The food system, climate change and CSR: from business to government case [in: Corporate social responsibility in food and agriculture]

Sodano, Valeria and Hingley, Martin (2013) The food system, climate change and CSR: from business to government case [in: Corporate social responsibility in food and agriculture]. British Food Journal, 115 (1). ISSN 0007-070X

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Abstract

Findings: It is argued that interventions to tackle climate change are political rather than economic and depend on
power relationships among different actors, such as states and large corporations, involved in their implementation.
The main conclusion of the article is that a renovated agenda to tackle climate change ought to be based on the two
pillars of soft regulation-voluntary CSR and binding state regulation. In this new scenario corporate and antitrust laws
should be used to correct the growing imbalance between corporate rights and corporate responsibility, with binding
regulations supporting voluntary CSR.
Originality: Application of CSR has been left to corporations who have pursued their own piecemeal agenda; and the
predominant creed of neoliberalism has been ineffectual in governance. This article questions its effectiveness and
proposes an original and potentially sustainable alternative.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Findings: It is argued that interventions to tackle climate change are political rather than economic and depend on power relationships among different actors, such as states and large corporations, involved in their implementation. The main conclusion of the article is that a renovated agenda to tackle climate change ought to be based on the two pillars of soft regulation-voluntary CSR and binding state regulation. In this new scenario corporate and antitrust laws should be used to correct the growing imbalance between corporate rights and corporate responsibility, with binding regulations supporting voluntary CSR. Originality: Application of CSR has been left to corporations who have pursued their own piecemeal agenda; and the predominant creed of neoliberalism has been ineffectual in governance. This article questions its effectiveness and proposes an original and potentially sustainable alternative.
Keywords:Food, climate change, CSR, government case, intervention, regulation
Subjects:N Business and Administrative studies > N100 Business studies
L Social studies > L113 Economic Policy
Divisions:College of Social Science > Lincoln Business School
ID Code:6983
Deposited By: Martin Hingley
Deposited On:28 Nov 2012 07:04
Last Modified:09 Jan 2013 11:03

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