Corporate social responsibility in food and agriculture

Hingley, Martin and Lindgreen, Adam and Reast, Jon (2013) Corporate social responsibility in food and agriculture. British Food Journal,, 115 (1). ISSN 0007-070x

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Abstract

There has been considerable academic and practitioner interest in corporate social responsibility (CSR) in recent years, such that it currently is identified as being high
on research agendas (Greenfield, 2004; Maignan and Ralston, 2002; McWilliams et al., 2006; Pearce and Doh, 2005). The argument has become more sophisticated and complex in the literature, such that CSR ‘‘not only is doing good, the right thing to do, but it also leads to doing better’’ (Bhattacharya and Sen, 2004, p. 9). Thus the debate has moved from ideology to reality. Many diverse aspects of CSR have been investigated (see, for example, Carroll and Shabana, 2010; Du et al., 2010; Maon et al., 2010; Noland and Philips, 2010; Wood, 2010 and it is widely argued that
organisations need to define their roles in society and apply social and ethical standards to their businesses (Lichtenstein et al., 2004). There are, however,
limitations to development and application and many organisations, struggle in this effort (Lindgreen et al., 2009; Maon et al., 2009). Despite the large output of
literature on the topic, we have only just begun to understand what is meant by CSR, with gaps remaining to be filled, and new fields needed to be explored (Lindgreen and
Swaen, 2009).The overall objective of this special issue is, therefore, to provide a comprehensive collection of cutting-edge theories and research on CSR in food and
Agriculture, an area at the forefront of critical human consumption, considerable social implications and environmental impact.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:There has been considerable academic and practitioner interest in corporate social responsibility (CSR) in recent years, such that it currently is identified as being high on research agendas (Greenfield, 2004; Maignan and Ralston, 2002; McWilliams et al., 2006; Pearce and Doh, 2005). The argument has become more sophisticated and complex in the literature, such that CSR ‘‘not only is doing good, the right thing to do, but it also leads to doing better’’ (Bhattacharya and Sen, 2004, p. 9). Thus the debate has moved from ideology to reality. Many diverse aspects of CSR have been investigated (see, for example, Carroll and Shabana, 2010; Du et al., 2010; Maon et al., 2010; Noland and Philips, 2010; Wood, 2010 and it is widely argued that organisations need to define their roles in society and apply social and ethical standards to their businesses (Lichtenstein et al., 2004). There are, however, limitations to development and application and many organisations, struggle in this effort (Lindgreen et al., 2009; Maon et al., 2009). Despite the large output of literature on the topic, we have only just begun to understand what is meant by CSR, with gaps remaining to be filled, and new fields needed to be explored (Lindgreen and Swaen, 2009).The overall objective of this special issue is, therefore, to provide a comprehensive collection of cutting-edge theories and research on CSR in food and Agriculture, an area at the forefront of critical human consumption, considerable social implications and environmental impact.
Keywords:CSR, Food, Agriculture
Subjects:N Business and Administrative studies > N500 Marketing
N Business and Administrative studies > N100 Business studies
Divisions:College of Social Science > Lincoln Business School
ID Code:6979
Deposited By: Martin Hingley
Deposited On:27 Nov 2012 23:31
Last Modified:13 Jan 2014 13:05

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