The impact of brief exposure and defusion interventions on implicit verbal relations in spider-fear

Moghaddam, Nima and Hart, Aidan (2011) The impact of brief exposure and defusion interventions on implicit verbal relations in spider-fear. In: ACBS World Conference IX, 11-15 July 2011, Polo Didattico, University of Parma.

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Abstract

The present study aimed to compare the impact of two treatment-analogue interventions (exposure and defusion) on implicit (and explicit) spider-fear in a non-clinical sample. The study additionally examined whether implicit (and explicit) spider-fear predicted behaviour towards the object of fear and whether intervention influenced behaviour (either directly or through effects on implicit/explicit fear). 48 participants were randomly allocated to either exposure or defusion. Participants completed pre- and post-intervention measures of implicit and explicit spider-fear and a post-intervention behavioural approach test. Implicit fear (D-IRAP score) incrementally predicted behaviour over explicit fear, replicating previous findings. However, neither intervention appeared to affect implicit fear. Interventions did have differential effects on explicit fear and overt behaviour; notably, defusion facilitated greater approach behaviour than exposure. Results are interpreted in relation to existing literature and consideration of methodological limitations. A need for further research into the malleability of relational responding was identified, particularly in relation to existing clinical treatments.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Presentation)
Additional Information:The present study aimed to compare the impact of two treatment-analogue interventions (exposure and defusion) on implicit (and explicit) spider-fear in a non-clinical sample. The study additionally examined whether implicit (and explicit) spider-fear predicted behaviour towards the object of fear and whether intervention influenced behaviour (either directly or through effects on implicit/explicit fear). 48 participants were randomly allocated to either exposure or defusion. Participants completed pre- and post-intervention measures of implicit and explicit spider-fear and a post-intervention behavioural approach test. Implicit fear (D-IRAP score) incrementally predicted behaviour over explicit fear, replicating previous findings. However, neither intervention appeared to affect implicit fear. Interventions did have differential effects on explicit fear and overt behaviour; notably, defusion facilitated greater approach behaviour than exposure. Results are interpreted in relation to existing literature and consideration of methodological limitations. A need for further research into the malleability of relational responding was identified, particularly in relation to existing clinical treatments.
Keywords:clinical psychology, implicit cognition, spider fear, ACT
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C810 Applied Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C840 Clinical Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:6822
Deposited By: Nima Moghaddam
Deposited On:14 Nov 2012 22:02
Last Modified:14 Nov 2012 22:02

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