The influence of demographic factors, processing speed and short-term memory on Iranian children’s pedestrian skills

Tabibi, Zahra and Pfeffer, Karen and Sharif, Jafar Talebian (2012) The influence of demographic factors, processing speed and short-term memory on Iranian children’s pedestrian skills. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 47 . pp. 87-93. ISSN 0001-4575

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The influence of demographic factors, processing speed and short-term memory on Iranian children’s pedestrian skills
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Abstract

Objectives: Young children, children from lower socioeconomic status and boys have the highest risk of
pedestrian injury. This study examined the relationship between cognition and specific pedestrian skills
of these groups of children in Iran.
Methods: 180 Iranian children aged 7 and 11 years from lower- and higher-socioeconomic status backgrounds
participated in the study. A task to identify safe and dangerous road crossing sites and to plan a
safe route to cross a road was administered to measure pedestrian skills. Coding and Digit Span subscales
of WISC-R were administered to assess processing speed and short-term memory.
Results: Identifying safe/dangerous road crossing-sites and safe route-construction abilities increased
with age. Boys scored higher than girls when identifying road crossing sites but did not differ to girls in
route-construction. Lower socioeconomic status children scored higher than higher socioeconomic status
children on the route-construction task. Girls from lower socioeconomic status backgrounds scored lowest on the identifying safe/dangerous sites task and girls from higher socioeconomic status backgrounds scored lowest on the route construction task. Speed of processing was a significant predictor for identifying crossing sites and socioeconomic status was a significant predictor for route-construction.
Conclusions: Pedestrian skills are complex and influenced by age, gender, socioeconomic status and cognitive development. Results are discussed in relation to child pedestrian safety research in Iran and road safety education for children.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Objectives: Young children, children from lower socioeconomic status and boys have the highest risk of pedestrian injury. This study examined the relationship between cognition and specific pedestrian skills of these groups of children in Iran. Methods: 180 Iranian children aged 7 and 11 years from lower- and higher-socioeconomic status backgrounds participated in the study. A task to identify safe and dangerous road crossing sites and to plan a safe route to cross a road was administered to measure pedestrian skills. Coding and Digit Span subscales of WISC-R were administered to assess processing speed and short-term memory. Results: Identifying safe/dangerous road crossing-sites and safe route-construction abilities increased with age. Boys scored higher than girls when identifying road crossing sites but did not differ to girls in route-construction. Lower socioeconomic status children scored higher than higher socioeconomic status children on the route-construction task. Girls from lower socioeconomic status backgrounds scored lowest on the identifying safe/dangerous sites task and girls from higher socioeconomic status backgrounds scored lowest on the route construction task. Speed of processing was a significant predictor for identifying crossing sites and socioeconomic status was a significant predictor for route-construction. Conclusions: Pedestrian skills are complex and influenced by age, gender, socioeconomic status and cognitive development. Results are discussed in relation to child pedestrian safety research in Iran and road safety education for children.
Keywords:Pedestrian safety, Development, Socioeconomic status, Cognition, Iranian children, Child injury
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C850 Cognitive Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C830 Experimental Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:6772
Deposited By: Alison Wilson
Deposited On:10 Nov 2012 20:28
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:18

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