Bacterial water quality and network hydraulic characteristics: a field study of a small, looped water distribution system using culture-independent molecular methods

Sekar, R. and Deines, P. and Machell, J. and Osborn, M. A. and Biggs, C. A. and Boxall, J. B. (2012) Bacterial water quality and network hydraulic characteristics: a field study of a small, looped water distribution system using culture-independent molecular methods. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 112 (6). pp. 1220-1234. ISSN 1364-5072

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2672.2012.05286.x

Abstract

Aims:  To determine the spatial and temporal variability in the abundance, structure and composition of planktonic bacterial assemblages sampled from a small, looped water distribution system and to interpret results with respect to hydraulic conditions.

Methods and Results:  Water samples were collected from five sampling points, twice a day at 06:00 h and 09:00 h on a Monday (following low weekend demand) and a Wednesday (higher midweek demand). All samples were fully compliant with current regulated parameter standards. This study did not show obvious changes in bacterial abundance (DAPI count) or community structure Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis with respect to sample site and hence to water age; however, the study did show temporal variability with respect to both sampling day and sample times.

Conclusions:  Data suggests that variations in the bacterial assemblages may be associated with the local system hydraulics: the bacterial composition and numbers, over short durations, are governed by the interaction of the bulk water and the biofilm influenced by the hydraulic conditions.

Significance and Impact of the Study:  This study demonstrates general stability in bacterial abundance, community structure and composition within the system studied. Trends and patterns supporting the transfer of idealized understanding to the real world were evident. Ultimately, such work will help to safeguard potable water quality, fundamental to public health.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Aims:  To determine the spatial and temporal variability in the abundance, structure and composition of planktonic bacterial assemblages sampled from a small, looped water distribution system and to interpret results with respect to hydraulic conditions. Methods and Results:  Water samples were collected from five sampling points, twice a day at 06:00 h and 09:00 h on a Monday (following low weekend demand) and a Wednesday (higher midweek demand). All samples were fully compliant with current regulated parameter standards. This study did not show obvious changes in bacterial abundance (DAPI count) or community structure Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis with respect to sample site and hence to water age; however, the study did show temporal variability with respect to both sampling day and sample times. Conclusions:  Data suggests that variations in the bacterial assemblages may be associated with the local system hydraulics: the bacterial composition and numbers, over short durations, are governed by the interaction of the bulk water and the biofilm influenced by the hydraulic conditions. Significance and Impact of the Study:  This study demonstrates general stability in bacterial abundance, community structure and composition within the system studied. Trends and patterns supporting the transfer of idealized understanding to the real world were evident. Ultimately, such work will help to safeguard potable water quality, fundamental to public health.
Keywords:biofilms; denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis;drinking water; enumeration; water age; water quality
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C510 Applied Microbiology
C Biological Sciences > C500 Microbiology
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
ID Code:6735
Deposited By:INVALID USER
Deposited On:30 Oct 2012 21:13
Last Modified:26 Feb 2013 21:19

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