Tabloid citizenship: the Daily Mirror and the invasions of Egypt (1956) and Iraq (2003)

Tulloch, John (2007) Tabloid citizenship: the Daily Mirror and the invasions of Egypt (1956) and Iraq (2003). Journalism studies, 8 (1). pp. 42-60. ISSN 1469-9699

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14616700601056825

Abstract

The UK tabloid newspaper, the Daily Mirror, waged two prolonged campaigns in 1956 and 2003 against the proposed invasions of Egypt and Iraq. This paper compares and contrasts the campaigns and explores the changing character and voice of the Mirror in the context of efforts to reposition the paper within the popular market, and exert political leverage. It reflects on the meaning of sincerity and identity in relation to newspapers. It analyses and compares the deployment of established tabloid techniques during the two campaigns, including stunts, the use of celebrities, petitions. Particular attention is paid to the presence—and absence—of representations of the reader and the tension between opposing the war and maintaining a patriotic posture by supporting front-line troops. The paper concludes that, although “tabloid citizenship” merely presents the illusion of political participation, in the case of the Iraq campaign, it reinvented the carnival of the popular press in interesting ways and temporarily gave space for some radical journalism attacking neo-imperialism

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:The UK tabloid newspaper, the Daily Mirror, waged two prolonged campaigns in 1956 and 2003 against the proposed invasions of Egypt and Iraq. This paper compares and contrasts the campaigns and explores the changing character and voice of the Mirror in the context of efforts to reposition the paper within the popular market, and exert political leverage. It reflects on the meaning of sincerity and identity in relation to newspapers. It analyses and compares the deployment of established tabloid techniques during the two campaigns, including stunts, the use of celebrities, petitions. Particular attention is paid to the presence—and absence—of representations of the reader and the tension between opposing the war and maintaining a patriotic posture by supporting front-line troops. The paper concludes that, although “tabloid citizenship” merely presents the illusion of political participation, in the case of the Iraq campaign, it reinvented the carnival of the popular press in interesting ways and temporarily gave space for some radical journalism attacking neo-imperialism
Keywords:Tabloid journalism, Iraq, Egypt, Daily Mirror
Subjects:P Mass Communications and Documentation > P500 Journalism
Divisions:College of Arts > Lincoln School of Journalism
ID Code:653
Deposited By: Bev Jones
Deposited On:22 Jun 2007
Last Modified:18 Jul 2011 16:12

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