Ovulation mode modifies paternity monopolization in mammals

Soulsbury, Carl D. (2010) Ovulation mode modifies paternity monopolization in mammals. Biology Letters, 6 (1). pp. 39-41. ISSN 1744-957X

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2009.0703

Abstract

There are two forms of ovulation: spontaneous
and induced. As copulation triggers ovulation
for induced ovulators, males can predict the
timing of ovulation and may have greater paternity
monopolization than spontaneous
ovulators. However, this prediction has never, to
my knowledge, been tested. Using a cross-species
comparison I examined the percentage of offspring
sired within a litter (single paternity)
and in social species the percentage of offspring
sired by the dominant male (alpha paternity).
My results indicate that ovulation mode alters
the ability of males to monopolize paternity,
with males of induced ovulators having higher
single paternity and greater alpha paternity
where male–female association is intermittent.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:There are two forms of ovulation: spontaneous and induced. As copulation triggers ovulation for induced ovulators, males can predict the timing of ovulation and may have greater paternity monopolization than spontaneous ovulators. However, this prediction has never, to my knowledge, been tested. Using a cross-species comparison I examined the percentage of offspring sired within a litter (single paternity) and in social species the percentage of offspring sired by the dominant male (alpha paternity). My results indicate that ovulation mode alters the ability of males to monopolize paternity, with males of induced ovulators having higher single paternity and greater alpha paternity where male–female association is intermittent.
Keywords:ovulation, paternity, mammals
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C120 Behavioural Biology
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
ID Code:6476
Deposited By: Carl Soulsbury
Deposited On:08 Oct 2012 21:59
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:16

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