Seven steps for improving influenza vaccination rates in risk-groups: findings from a national cross sectional survey in UK general practice

Siriwardena, A. Niroshan and Dexter, Laura J. and Teare, M. Dawn and Dexter, Matthew and Read, Robert C. (2012) Seven steps for improving influenza vaccination rates in risk-groups: findings from a national cross sectional survey in UK general practice. In: SAPC 41st Annual Scientific Meeting, 2-4 October 2012, United Kingdom.

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Seven steps for improving influenza vaccination rates in high risk groups: findings from a national cross sectional survey in UK general practice
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Abstract

The problem: Seasonal influenza vaccination rates in at-risk population in the UK are below the national and international target of 75%. Of people aged over 65 years in England 72.8% received influenza (flu) vaccine in 2010/11, just below the target of 75%. However, flu vaccination rates during 2010/11 in the under 65 year old at-risk groups was just 50.4%, which fell far short of 75%; in pregnant women who were not otherwise at risk the vaccination rate was only 36.6%, despite increasing evidence showing the beneficial effects of protection against flu for both mothers and babies. Evidence-based guidance, to advise practices how to optimise all aspects of their flu vaccination campaigns and maximise their likelihood of protecting at-risk patients against flu and its serious sequelae is greatly needed.
This study sought to identify which strategies and procedures were associated with higher rates of flu vaccine uptake.
The approach: An online questionnaire survey was administered to general practitioners (GPs), nursing
staff and practice managers in 795 practices across England. We used logistic regression to analyse data for factors independently associated with higher practice flu vaccination rates in at-risk groups.
Findings: The survey was completed by 569 practice managers, 335 nursing staff and 107 GPs. We identified seven independent factors associated with higher flu vaccination rates. Having a lead staff member for planning the flu campaign and producing a written report of practice performance predicted an 8% higher vaccination rate for at-risk patients aged <65 years (OR 1.37; 95% CI 1.10 to 1.71). These strategies, plus sending a personal invitation to all eligible patients and only stopping vaccination when Quality and Outcomes framework (QOF) targets were reached, predicted a 7% higher vaccination rate (OR 1.45; 95% CI 1.10 to 1.92) in patients aged 65 years and over. Using a lead member of staff for identifying eligible patients, with either a modified manufacturer’s or in-house search program for interrogating the practice computer system, independently
predicted a 4% higher vaccination rate in patients aged 65 years and over (OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.41 / OR 1.20; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.40). The provision of flu vaccine by midwives was associated with a 4% higher vaccination rate in pregnant women (OR 1.19; 1.02 to 1.40).
Consequences: Clear leadership, effective communication with patients, and methods used to identify and contact eligible patients were independently associated with significantly higher rates of flu vaccination. Financial targets appear to incentivise practices to work harder to maximise seasonal influenza vaccine uptake. The strategies identified here could help primary care providers to substantially increase their seasonal flu vaccination rates to meet or even exceed national targets.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Presentation)
Additional Information:The problem: Seasonal influenza vaccination rates in at-risk population in the UK are below the national and international target of 75%. Of people aged over 65 years in England 72.8% received influenza (flu) vaccine in 2010/11, just below the target of 75%. However, flu vaccination rates during 2010/11 in the under 65 year old at-risk groups was just 50.4%, which fell far short of 75%; in pregnant women who were not otherwise at risk the vaccination rate was only 36.6%, despite increasing evidence showing the beneficial effects of protection against flu for both mothers and babies. Evidence-based guidance, to advise practices how to optimise all aspects of their flu vaccination campaigns and maximise their likelihood of protecting at-risk patients against flu and its serious sequelae is greatly needed. This study sought to identify which strategies and procedures were associated with higher rates of flu vaccine uptake. The approach: An online questionnaire survey was administered to general practitioners (GPs), nursing staff and practice managers in 795 practices across England. We used logistic regression to analyse data for factors independently associated with higher practice flu vaccination rates in at-risk groups. Findings: The survey was completed by 569 practice managers, 335 nursing staff and 107 GPs. We identified seven independent factors associated with higher flu vaccination rates. Having a lead staff member for planning the flu campaign and producing a written report of practice performance predicted an 8% higher vaccination rate for at-risk patients aged <65 years (OR 1.37; 95% CI 1.10 to 1.71). These strategies, plus sending a personal invitation to all eligible patients and only stopping vaccination when Quality and Outcomes framework (QOF) targets were reached, predicted a 7% higher vaccination rate (OR 1.45; 95% CI 1.10 to 1.92) in patients aged 65 years and over. Using a lead member of staff for identifying eligible patients, with either a modified manufacturer’s or in-house search program for interrogating the practice computer system, independently predicted a 4% higher vaccination rate in patients aged 65 years and over (OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.41 / OR 1.20; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.40). The provision of flu vaccine by midwives was associated with a 4% higher vaccination rate in pregnant women (OR 1.19; 1.02 to 1.40). Consequences: Clear leadership, effective communication with patients, and methods used to identify and contact eligible patients were independently associated with significantly higher rates of flu vaccination. Financial targets appear to incentivise practices to work harder to maximise seasonal influenza vaccine uptake. The strategies identified here could help primary care providers to substantially increase their seasonal flu vaccination rates to meet or even exceed national targets.
Keywords:quality improvement, influenza vaccination, general practice, cross sectional studies, questionnaire survey, primary care
Subjects:B Subjects allied to Medicine > B714 Practice Nursing
B Subjects allied to Medicine > B710 Community Nursing
A Medicine and Dentistry > A300 Clinical Medicine
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
ID Code:6458
Deposited By: Niro Siriwardena
Deposited On:07 Oct 2012 12:31
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:16

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