Value priorities as a determinant of paternal and maternal involvement in child care

Gaunt, Ruth (2005) Value priorities as a determinant of paternal and maternal involvement in child care. Journal of Marriage and Family, 67 (3). pp. 643-655. ISSN 0022-2445

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Official URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3600194

Abstract

This study used the theory of human values to explore parents’ involvement with their children. The relationships between maternal and paternal value priorities and various forms of involvement in childcare were examined in a sample of 209 couples with one child between 6 and 36 months of age. As predicted, giving high priority to openness-to-change values (e.g., self-direction, stimulation) and low priority to conservation values (e.g., tradition, conformity, security) is associated with more father involvement and less mother involvement. Moreover, and as predicted, the priority given by a spouse to achievement values is negatively related to this spouse’s involvement in childcare, and positively related to the other spouse’s involvement. Parents’ sociodemographic characteristics partly mediate the associations between value priorities and involvement. The findings also indicate the importance of distinguishing different forms of involvement in childcare.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:This study used the theory of human values to explore parents’ involvement with their children. The relationships between maternal and paternal value priorities and various forms of involvement in childcare were examined in a sample of 209 couples with one child between 6 and 36 months of age. As predicted, giving high priority to openness-to-change values (e.g., self-direction, stimulation) and low priority to conservation values (e.g., tradition, conformity, security) is associated with more father involvement and less mother involvement. Moreover, and as predicted, the priority given by a spouse to achievement values is negatively related to this spouse’s involvement in childcare, and positively related to the other spouse’s involvement. Parents’ sociodemographic characteristics partly mediate the associations between value priorities and involvement. The findings also indicate the importance of distinguishing different forms of involvement in childcare.
Keywords:childcare, father involvement, parenting, value priorities
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:6399
Deposited By: Ruth Gaunt
Deposited On:02 Oct 2012 11:48
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:15

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