Job insecurity and gender: the moderating role of gender ideology

Gaunt, Ruth and Benjamin, Orly (2007) Job insecurity and gender: the moderating role of gender ideology. Community, Work & Family, 10 (3). pp. 341-355. ISSN 1366-8803

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13668800701456336

Abstract

This study examined the complex relationships between gender, job insecurity and job related stress. Previous findings have suggested that men experience greater job insecurity than women, and are more vulnerable to job-related stress. The current study tested the hypothesis that the gender ideology of employees moderates the effect of gender on job insecurity and stress. Data were obtained by questionnaires from a sample of 203 married employees. The results showed that traditional men experience greater job insecurity than traditional women. However, as hypothesized, egalitarian men and women exhibited similar degrees of job insecurity. Furthermore, job insecurity in traditional men and in egalitarian men and women was related to loss of control stress, financial stress, and stress expressions at home, whereas traditional women were relatively protected from job-related stress. These findings illuminate the important moderating role played by gender ideology in the relationships between gender, job insecurity and stress.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:This study examined the complex relationships between gender, job insecurity and job related stress. Previous findings have suggested that men experience greater job insecurity than women, and are more vulnerable to job-related stress. The current study tested the hypothesis that the gender ideology of employees moderates the effect of gender on job insecurity and stress. Data were obtained by questionnaires from a sample of 203 married employees. The results showed that traditional men experience greater job insecurity than traditional women. However, as hypothesized, egalitarian men and women exhibited similar degrees of job insecurity. Furthermore, job insecurity in traditional men and in egalitarian men and women was related to loss of control stress, financial stress, and stress expressions at home, whereas traditional women were relatively protected from job-related stress. These findings illuminate the important moderating role played by gender ideology in the relationships between gender, job insecurity and stress.
Keywords:gender, gender ideology, job insecurity, stress
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:6396
Deposited By: Ruth Gaunt
Deposited On:01 Oct 2012 22:29
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:15

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