The bows and arrows of Agincourt: can the lessons of medieval history be used to inspire and engage the next generation of operations managers?

Owens, Jonathan D. and Wilkinson, Henry T. and Ramsden, Gary (2012) The bows and arrows of Agincourt: can the lessons of medieval history be used to inspire and engage the next generation of operations managers? [Teaching Resource] (Unpublished)

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The bows and arrows of Agincourt: can the lessons of medieval history be used to Inspire and engage the next generation of operations managers?
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Abstract

Purpose – This paper aims to stimulate student interest in, and engagement with the subject of Operations Management.

Design/methodology/approach – Assess the approaches that Henry V took to address the Operational, Supply Chain and Purchasing Management issues that faced his medieval English Army as he prepared it for the invasion of France in 1415, through the innovative application of modern day academic theory.

Findings – Henry V was a talented Operations Manager who evidently utilised what are now recognised academic theories within the subject field. Subsequently, by inadvertently using these theories he successfully led the English army to triumph at the Battle of Agincourt and to ultimately win the French throne.

Research limitations/implications – This paper is focused on quite limited period in English history (1413 to 1415), consequently, it relies on student interest and engagement with this particular series of events. However, perhaps the further application of Operations Management theory to other significant worldwide historical events could provide operations management educationalists more scope for discussion and aid student engagement.

Practical implications – To provide operations management educationalists with an innovative means to stimulate initial student interest in the issues surrounding Operations Management.

Originality/value – This paper could be used as a ‘spring board’ by educationalists and students alike into the academic world of Operations Management.

Item Type:Teaching Resource
Additional Information:Purpose – This paper aims to stimulate student interest in, and engagement with the subject of Operations Management. Design/methodology/approach – Assess the approaches that Henry V took to address the Operational, Supply Chain and Purchasing Management issues that faced his medieval English Army as he prepared it for the invasion of France in 1415, through the innovative application of modern day academic theory. Findings – Henry V was a talented Operations Manager who evidently utilised what are now recognised academic theories within the subject field. Subsequently, by inadvertently using these theories he successfully led the English army to triumph at the Battle of Agincourt and to ultimately win the French throne. Research limitations/implications – This paper is focused on quite limited period in English history (1413 to 1415), consequently, it relies on student interest and engagement with this particular series of events. However, perhaps the further application of Operations Management theory to other significant worldwide historical events could provide operations management educationalists more scope for discussion and aid student engagement. Practical implications – To provide operations management educationalists with an innovative means to stimulate initial student interest in the issues surrounding Operations Management. Originality/value – This paper could be used as a ‘spring board’ by educationalists and students alike into the academic world of Operations Management.
Keywords:Operations Management, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Purchasing Management.
Subjects:N Business and Administrative studies > N210 Management Techniques
N Business and Administrative studies > N990 Business and Administrative studies not elsewhere classified
N Business and Administrative studies > N100 Business studies
N Business and Administrative studies > N200 Management studies
Divisions:College of Social Science > Lincoln Business School
ID Code:6370
Deposited By:INVALID USER
Deposited On:28 Sep 2012 17:12
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:15

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