Targeted killing as a means of asymmetric warfare: a provocative view and invitation to debate

Bachmann, Sascha-Dominik and Haeussler, Ulf (2011) Targeted killing as a means of asymmetric warfare: a provocative view and invitation to debate. Law, Crime and History, 1 (1). pp. 9-15. ISSN 2045-9238

Documents
BachmanHaussler_Targeted_Killings_LCH.pdf
[img]
[Download]
[img]
Preview
PDF
BachmanHaussler_Targeted_Killings_LCH.pdf - Whole Document

165kB

Abstract

The killing of Mahmoud al-Mabhou reportedly by agents of Israel‟s Mossad service in Dubai a year ago1 serves as a quick reminder that extrajudicial executions, assassinations and other targeted killing operations are taking place and are part of a modern democracy‟s arsenal of antiterrorism and counter-terrorism means. Targeted Killing Operations reportedly form part of NATO‟s operational practice: depending on the circumstances they represent just another option of the lawful use of force in an armed conflict or assimilated situations. Consequently, it is argued that International Law does not impose an explicit ban on the lethal neutralization of certain persons in an armed conflict scenario. This opinion provides a provocative view on possible justifications using targeted killing as an actual means of present day security operations – which must not be confused with traditional methods of domestic „policing‟ in a democratic state.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:The killing of Mahmoud al-Mabhou reportedly by agents of Israel‟s Mossad service in Dubai a year ago1 serves as a quick reminder that extrajudicial executions, assassinations and other targeted killing operations are taking place and are part of a modern democracy‟s arsenal of antiterrorism and counter-terrorism means. Targeted Killing Operations reportedly form part of NATO‟s operational practice: depending on the circumstances they represent just another option of the lawful use of force in an armed conflict or assimilated situations. Consequently, it is argued that International Law does not impose an explicit ban on the lethal neutralization of certain persons in an armed conflict scenario. This opinion provides a provocative view on possible justifications using targeted killing as an actual means of present day security operations – which must not be confused with traditional methods of domestic „policing‟ in a democratic state.
Keywords:counter-terrorism, Terrorism, war on terrorism, targeted killing, Drones, Law of Armed Conflict
Subjects:M Law > M200 Law by Topic
M Law > M130 Public International Law
Divisions:College of Social Science > Lincoln Law School
ID Code:6301
Deposited By:INVALID USER
Deposited On:27 Sep 2012 16:21
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:14

Repository Staff Only: item control page