A year of living dangerously: collaborating with undergraduate students

O'Neill, Mary (2010) A year of living dangerously: collaborating with undergraduate students. In: International Conference on Learning & Teaching: Creative Pedagogies, Changing Perspectives, Crossing Boundaries, 9th June 2010, Singapore.

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A YEAR OF LIVING DANGEROUSLY: COLLABORATING WITH UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS
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Abstract

This presentation outlines the insights gained from a year of collaborative projects carried out as part of a Higher Education Academy Art Media and Design Fellowship (UK). The projects required the participants to collaborate across divides – the staff-student divide, the disciplinary divide, and cultural and language divides. Because of the experimental nature of the projects a ‘leap of faith’ was required on behalf of all the participants and the results were often surprising and unexpected. ‘The Lincoln Studio’ was a collaborative project between fine art staff and students that explored the studio as an active element in the production of artworks rather than as a mere place. ‘Lincolnshire Landscape’ was a cross-disciplinary project that involved fine art, creative lens media and journalism students working together on a project where they explored the Lincolnshire countryside, which would be an unfamiliar environment for most of the participants. ‘Belonging’ was a collaborative project between two art and design departments at the University of Lincoln and the fine art department at the Escola de Belas Artes, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil. The final project offered undergraduate students an opportunity to work with a member of academic staff on a joint research project that reflected a shared interest. The Deweyan philosophy of these projects emphasised a sharing of authority and responsibility between staff and students and a focus on the experience as a means of creating an enhanced learning environment. This presentation will explore the pedagogic insights drawn from the experience; looking at the students’ response immediately after the project and again several months later to assess the long term impact of these initiatives.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Additional Information:This presentation outlines the insights gained from a year of collaborative projects carried out as part of a Higher Education Academy Art Media and Design Fellowship (UK). The projects required the participants to collaborate across divides – the staff-student divide, the disciplinary divide, and cultural and language divides. Because of the experimental nature of the projects a ‘leap of faith’ was required on behalf of all the participants and the results were often surprising and unexpected. ‘The Lincoln Studio’ was a collaborative project between fine art staff and students that explored the studio as an active element in the production of artworks rather than as a mere place. ‘Lincolnshire Landscape’ was a cross-disciplinary project that involved fine art, creative lens media and journalism students working together on a project where they explored the Lincolnshire countryside, which would be an unfamiliar environment for most of the participants. ‘Belonging’ was a collaborative project between two art and design departments at the University of Lincoln and the fine art department at the Escola de Belas Artes, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil. The final project offered undergraduate students an opportunity to work with a member of academic staff on a joint research project that reflected a shared interest. The Deweyan philosophy of these projects emphasised a sharing of authority and responsibility between staff and students and a focus on the experience as a means of creating an enhanced learning environment. This presentation will explore the pedagogic insights drawn from the experience; looking at the students’ response immediately after the project and again several months later to assess the long term impact of these initiatives.
Keywords:Collaboration, Creative collaboration, student as producer, Collaborative learning, Mary O'Neill, Lincoln Studio, Higher Education Academy, HEA- ADM, HEA - ADM fellowship, Art education, Collaborative practices, Pedagogical practice, Enhanced learning environment, Dewey, Deweyan philosophy, Lincolnshire landscape, Fund for Educational Development, Undergraduate research, Fine art, Studio practice, Creative pedagogies
Subjects:L Social studies > L433 Education Policy
W Creative Arts and Design > W100 Fine Art
W Creative Arts and Design > W190 Fine Art not elsewhere classified
Divisions:College of Arts > Lincoln School of Architecture
ID Code:6247
Deposited By: Mary O'Neill
Deposited On:28 Sep 2012 10:32
Last Modified:11 Aug 2014 17:06

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