Structure of a group A streptococcal phage-encoded virulence factor reveals a catalytically active triple-stranded beta-helix

Smith, Nicola L. and Taylor, Edward J. and Lindsay, Anna-Marie and Charnock, Simon J. and Turkenburg, Johan P. and Dodson, Eleanor J. and Davies, Gideon J. and Black, Gary W. (2005) Structure of a group A streptococcal phage-encoded virulence factor reveals a catalytically active triple-stranded beta-helix. PNAS Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 102 (49). pp. 17652-17657. ISSN 1091-6490

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0504782102

Abstract

Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus) causes severe invasive infections including scarlet fever, pharyngitis (streptococcal sore throat), skin infections, necrotizing fasciitis (flesh-eating disease), septicemia, erysipelas, cellulitis, acute rheumatic fever, and toxic shock. The conversion from nonpathogenic to toxigenic strains of S. pyogenes is frequently mediated by bacteriophage infection. One of the key bacteriophage-encoded virulence factors is a putative "hyaluronidase," HylP1, a phage tail-fiber protein responsible for the digestion of the S. pyogenes hyaluronan capsule during phage infection. Here we demonstrate that HylP1 is a hyaluronate lyase. The 3D structure, at 1.8-angstroms resolution, reveals an unusual triple-stranded beta-helical structure and provides insight into the structural basis for phage tail assembly and the role of phage tail proteins in virulence. Unlike the triple-stranded beta-helix assemblies of the bacteriophage T4 injection machinery and the tailspike endosialidase of the Escherichia coli K1 bacteriophage K1F, HylP1 possesses three copies of the active center on the triple-helical fiber itself without the need for an accessory catalytic domain. The triple-stranded beta-helix is not simply a structural scaffold, as previously envisaged; it is harnessed to provide a 200-angstroms-long substrate-binding groove for the optimal reduction in hyaluronan viscosity to aid phage penetration of the capsule.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus) causes severe invasive infections including scarlet fever, pharyngitis (streptococcal sore throat), skin infections, necrotizing fasciitis (flesh-eating disease), septicemia, erysipelas, cellulitis, acute rheumatic fever, and toxic shock. The conversion from nonpathogenic to toxigenic strains of S. pyogenes is frequently mediated by bacteriophage infection. One of the key bacteriophage-encoded virulence factors is a putative "hyaluronidase," HylP1, a phage tail-fiber protein responsible for the digestion of the S. pyogenes hyaluronan capsule during phage infection. Here we demonstrate that HylP1 is a hyaluronate lyase. The 3D structure, at 1.8-angstroms resolution, reveals an unusual triple-stranded beta-helical structure and provides insight into the structural basis for phage tail assembly and the role of phage tail proteins in virulence. Unlike the triple-stranded beta-helix assemblies of the bacteriophage T4 injection machinery and the tailspike endosialidase of the Escherichia coli K1 bacteriophage K1F, HylP1 possesses three copies of the active center on the triple-helical fiber itself without the need for an accessory catalytic domain. The triple-stranded beta-helix is not simply a structural scaffold, as previously envisaged; it is harnessed to provide a 200-angstroms-long substrate-binding groove for the optimal reduction in hyaluronan viscosity to aid phage penetration of the capsule.
Keywords:phage tail-fiber protein, hylp1, triple-helical fiber, hyaluronate lyase
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C700 Molecular Biology, Biophysics and Biochemistry
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
ID Code:6170
Deposited By: Edward Taylor
Deposited On:18 Sep 2012 17:43
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:13

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