Integrating online communities and social networks with computerised treatment for insomnia: a qualitative study of service user and multiprofessional primary health care perspectives

Siriwardena, A. Niroshan and Middlemass, Jo and Davy, Zowie and Cavanagh, Kate and Linehan, Conor and Morgan, Kevin and Lawson, Shaun (2012) Integrating online communities and social networks with computerised treatment for insomnia: a qualitative study of service user and multiprofessional primary health care perspectives. In: The Future of Primary Healthcare in Europe IV, 3-4 October 2012, Museum of World Culture, Gothenburg. (Unpublished)

Documents
Integrating online communities and social networks with computerised treatment for insomnia: a qualitative study of service user and multiprofessional primary health care perspectives
[img]
[Download]
[img]
Preview
PDF
ENACTGoteborg2012.pdf - Presentation
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

762kB

Abstract

Purpose: We explored patient and multiprofessional health perspectives to inform the development of a computerised cognitive behavioural therapy programme for insomnia (CCBT-I) that includes social networking.
Theory: We used a qualitative design and theory of planned behaviour to underpin the analysis.
Methods: Interviews and focus groups were held with service users and health professionals to elicit beliefs and intentions that might facilitate or create barriers to the uptake and adherence to CCBT-I.
Findings: We interviewed 23 health professionals and 28 patients. Features designed to increase confidence in CCBT-I; engender trust in professional relationships; provide online support and improve programme functionality were perceived to increase the successful uptake and adherence. Interaction with other users via integrated social networking would provide mutual support but concerns included apprehension about online ‘strangers’ and information security. Patients wanted mobile applications; access in short periods; self-assessment; more interactive, personalised information on sleep and moderated contact with other users.
Discussion: Improving uptake and adherence to online programmes for insomnia requires design features which are focused on trust and functionality. Computerised therapies for insomnia would allow access treatment for more people across geographical and heath system borders.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Presentation)
Additional Information:Purpose: We explored patient and multiprofessional health perspectives to inform the development of a computerised cognitive behavioural therapy programme for insomnia (CCBT-I) that includes social networking. Theory: We used a qualitative design and theory of planned behaviour to underpin the analysis. Methods: Interviews and focus groups were held with service users and health professionals to elicit beliefs and intentions that might facilitate or create barriers to the uptake and adherence to CCBT-I. Findings: We interviewed 23 health professionals and 28 patients. Features designed to increase confidence in CCBT-I; engender trust in professional relationships; provide online support and improve programme functionality were perceived to increase the successful uptake and adherence. Interaction with other users via integrated social networking would provide mutual support but concerns included apprehension about online ‘strangers’ and information security. Patients wanted mobile applications; access in short periods; self-assessment; more interactive, personalised information on sleep and moderated contact with other users. Discussion: Improving uptake and adherence to online programmes for insomnia requires design features which are focused on trust and functionality. Computerised therapies for insomnia would allow access treatment for more people across geographical and heath system borders.
Keywords:insomnia, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Insomnia, computertised cognitive behavioural therapy, social networks, online communities, qualitative study, interprofessional working
Subjects:B Subjects allied to Medicine > B230 Pharmacy
B Subjects allied to Medicine > B714 Practice Nursing
A Medicine and Dentistry > A300 Clinical Medicine
B Subjects allied to Medicine > B760 Mental Health Nursing
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
ID Code:6125
Deposited By: Niro Siriwardena
Deposited On:08 Sep 2012 17:32
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:13

Repository Staff Only: item control page