Coping and adjustment strategies used by emergency services staff after traumatic incidents: implications for psychological debriefing, reconstructed early intervention and psychological first aid

Orner, Roderick J. and King, S. and Bretherton, R. and Stolz, P. and Ormerod, J. (2003) Coping and adjustment strategies used by emergency services staff after traumatic incidents: implications for psychological debriefing, reconstructed early intervention and psychological first aid. The Australasian Journal of Disaster and Trauma Studies, 2003 (1). ISSN 1174-4707

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Official URL: http://www.massey.ac.nz/~trauma/issues/2003-1/orne...

Abstract

This survey reports few points of convergence between post incident coping and adjustment strategies used by 217 experienced emergency services and the principles that inform delivery of debriefing services. Officers prefer immediate access to colleagues and those with whom they feel close. Most wish to talk freely and flexibly about events and prefer to be consulted about a possible need for early intervention. Cluster analysis identified five core components of deliberate coping strategies; wait and see, rest and relaxation, finding relief from somatosensory sequelae, re-establish routines and a sense of control, and graded confrontation with distressing reminders

Item Type:Article
Keywords:Post-traumatic stress, Trauma, Debriefing, Coping, Psychological Debriefing, Early Intervention, Emergency Services, Peer Support
Subjects:B Subjects allied to Medicine > B760 Mental Health Nursing
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
ID Code:612
Deposited By: Bev Jones
Deposited On:05 Oct 2007
Last Modified:28 May 2013 10:39

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