Yesterday’s church of tomorrow: St. John the Baptist, Ermine Estate

Szynalska, Karolina (2011) Yesterday’s church of tomorrow: St. John the Baptist, Ermine Estate. In: The History and Heritage of Post-war Council Estates, June 2011, Bishop Grosseteste University College Lincoln. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Consecrated in 1963, the parish church of St. John the Baptist is a major contribution to ecclesiastical architecture of the second half of the 20th century. This avant-garde building is the central feature of the Ermine Estate in the provincial city of Lincoln. Its importance lies in combining innovative minimalist architectural thinking with advanced liturgical planning. The structure was designed by an architect largely invisible in architectural history, Sam Scorer, and a structural engineer, Hajnal Konyi. It consists of an impressive hyperbolic paraboloid roof made in reinforced concrete. Its form was fashionable and functional (romantically rational). It gave an impression of contradicting laws of gravity. It summarizes the post-war excitement with engineering.
The paper contains a discussion about contradictions and discontinuities that occur in the story of this intriguing architectural precedent.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Additional Information:Consecrated in 1963, the parish church of St. John the Baptist is a major contribution to ecclesiastical architecture of the second half of the 20th century. This avant-garde building is the central feature of the Ermine Estate in the provincial city of Lincoln. Its importance lies in combining innovative minimalist architectural thinking with advanced liturgical planning. The structure was designed by an architect largely invisible in architectural history, Sam Scorer, and a structural engineer, Hajnal Konyi. It consists of an impressive hyperbolic paraboloid roof made in reinforced concrete. Its form was fashionable and functional (romantically rational). It gave an impression of contradicting laws of gravity. It summarizes the post-war excitement with engineering. The paper contains a discussion about contradictions and discontinuities that occur in the story of this intriguing architectural precedent.
Keywords:Sam Scorer, hypar, hyperbolic paraboloid, concrete shell, architecture, Lincoln
Subjects:K Architecture, Building and Planning > K200 Building
K Architecture, Building and Planning > K110 Architectural Design Theory
K Architecture, Building and Planning > K100 Architecture
Divisions:College of Arts > Lincoln School of Architecture
ID Code:6003
Deposited By: Karolina Szynalska
Deposited On:24 Jul 2012 12:46
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:12

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