West End Walkers 65+: using programme theory to enhance outcome assessment in a randomised controlled trial

Evans, Adam and Fitzsimons, Claire and Rowe, David and Grealy, Madeleine and Granat, Malcolm and Grant, Margaret and McConnachie, Alex and Shaw, Bekki and Macdonald, Hazel and Skelton, Dawn and Blamey, Avril and Mutrie, Nanette (2009) West End Walkers 65+: using programme theory to enhance outcome assessment in a randomised controlled trial. In: University of Strathclyde Research Day 2009, May 2009, Glasgow.

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Abstract

Background: Walking has great potential to engage people in physical activity (PA), and could address health problems associated with sedentary living. Previous research showed increasing walking behaviour in inactive adults aged 18-65 years is feasible 1. However, a systematic review showed that evidence on how to encourage older adults to increase walking is lacking 2. This study aims to test a pedometer-based walking programme in combination with a PA consultation with adults aged 65 years+ in a primary care setting and to design a study protocol that enables shared learning outcomes.

Methods: Over 12 months, West End Walkers 65+ will recruit 46 participants, aged 65 years+. Participants will be allocated to: Group 1 PA consultation, individualised walking programme and pedometer; or Group 2 a waiting list control group. Step counts, activity patterns and psychological measures will be assessed pre and post intervention. Focus groups and interviews will be completed with participants and stakeholders post intervention.

Programme Theory: Feasibility of the intervention will be assessed using a programme theory. A programme’s theory conceptualises what must be done to bring about desired outcomes. This allows comparison between project planning and design and programme processes3. A triangulation of qualitative and quantitative research measures will inform this assessment. Feasibility will be assessed using goals designed to promote shared and transferrable learning outcomes.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)
Additional Information:Background: Walking has great potential to engage people in physical activity (PA), and could address health problems associated with sedentary living. Previous research showed increasing walking behaviour in inactive adults aged 18-65 years is feasible 1. However, a systematic review showed that evidence on how to encourage older adults to increase walking is lacking 2. This study aims to test a pedometer-based walking programme in combination with a PA consultation with adults aged 65 years+ in a primary care setting and to design a study protocol that enables shared learning outcomes. Methods: Over 12 months, West End Walkers 65+ will recruit 46 participants, aged 65 years+. Participants will be allocated to: Group 1 PA consultation, individualised walking programme and pedometer; or Group 2 a waiting list control group. Step counts, activity patterns and psychological measures will be assessed pre and post intervention. Focus groups and interviews will be completed with participants and stakeholders post intervention. Programme Theory: Feasibility of the intervention will be assessed using a programme theory. A programme’s theory conceptualises what must be done to bring about desired outcomes. This allows comparison between project planning and design and programme processes3. A triangulation of qualitative and quantitative research measures will inform this assessment. Feasibility will be assessed using goals designed to promote shared and transferrable learning outcomes.
Keywords:Older Adults, Health, Physical Activity, Pedometers
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C841 Health Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Sport and Exercise Science
ID Code:5988
Deposited By: Adam Evans
Deposited On:21 Jul 2012 11:07
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:11

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