Microenvironments within glass-fronted book cases: a study comparing environmental changes within books and interactions with local environments

Buelow, Anna and Watt, David and Colston, Belinda (2003) Microenvironments within glass-fronted book cases: a study comparing environmental changes within books and interactions with local environments. Papier Restaurierung, 4 (3). pp. 23-31. ISSN 1563-2628

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Abstract

Previous research within the field of architectural conservation has suggested that housing a large amount of paper material within a building might benefit the building fabric, as paper is able to absorb and desorb excess moisture and thus act as an environmental buffer. This study seeks to improve the understanding of microenvironments within enclosed spaces and how they relate to ambient and external conditions.
Two case studies have been selected for environmental monitoring, one with a very stable environment and the other an extremely unstable environment throughout the year. A total of eight dataloggers were used over a 12-month period. Macro- and microclimates under different conditions were investigated by monitoring and analysing conditions within two dummy books, empty and fully-packed shelves, and both ambient and external conditions.
Resulting data have assisted in explaining the interaction between paper and their immediate environment, and confirmed that the microenvironment of a confined space is influenced by the amount of paper housed within it. Moreover, it is suggested that the overall surface area available for environmental interaction is more important than the paper type or book size. In addition, paper may have a negative impact during certain times of the year, forcing its environment to higher RH levels during dryer seasons by desorbing excess moisture.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Previous research within the field of architectural conservation has suggested that housing a large amount of paper material within a building might benefit the building fabric, as paper is able to absorb and desorb excess moisture and thus act as an environmental buffer. This study seeks to improve the understanding of microenvironments within enclosed spaces and how they relate to ambient and external conditions. Two case studies have been selected for environmental monitoring, one with a very stable environment and the other an extremely unstable environment throughout the year. A total of eight dataloggers were used over a 12-month period. Macro- and microclimates under different conditions were investigated by monitoring and analysing conditions within two dummy books, empty and fully-packed shelves, and both ambient and external conditions. Resulting data have assisted in explaining the interaction between paper and their immediate environment, and confirmed that the microenvironment of a confined space is influenced by the amount of paper housed within it. Moreover, it is suggested that the overall surface area available for environmental interaction is more important than the paper type or book size. In addition, paper may have a negative impact during certain times of the year, forcing its environment to higher RH levels during dryer seasons by desorbing excess moisture.
Keywords:paper-based collections, preventive conservation, environmental monitoring
Subjects:F Physical Sciences > F200 Materials Science
F Physical Sciences > F140 Environmental Chemistry
W Creative Arts and Design > W160 Fine Art Conservation
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
ID Code:5869
Deposited By: Belinda Colston
Deposited On:15 Jun 2012 09:10
Last Modified:15 Jun 2012 09:10

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