Ethnographies of critique: critical judgment as cultural practice

Amsler, Sarah (2009) Ethnographies of critique: critical judgment as cultural practice. In: The Future(s) of Critical Theory, 19th - 21st March 2009, University of Frankfurt. (Unpublished)

DocumentsOthers
Ethnographies_of_critique_-_DRAFT.pdf
[img]
[Download]
[img]
Preview
HTML
Ethnographies_of_critique_-_DRAFT.pdf

559kB
[img]
Preview
PDF
Ethnographies_of_critique_-_DRAFT.pdf

559kB

Official URL: http://www.graduateconferencefrankfurt.de/index.ph...

Abstract

INTRODUCTION This paper sketches out some preliminary thoughts about what it might mean to conceptualise critique as a textured and variegated cultural practice, and whether it is possible and desirable to study it as we do other cultural practices, ethnographically. I would like to begin by posing three questions, taking as a point of departure Nikolas Kompridis’ statement that in modern capitalist societies there is nothing ‘more urgent today than to resist the sense that our possibilities are contracting or that they are exhausted’ (2006: 280). First, then, is this statement true, in the broadest sense of the term? Second, if this were the case, what kind of cultural practices, what kinds of knowledge, and what ways of being with others have the effect of opening futures up rather than closing them down—and should we necessarily accept the ones that critical theorists recommend as positive goods? Finally, if we can recognise these practices in theoretical or philosophical terms, should we also try to study them in more ‘empirical’ or interpretive ways?

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Presentation)
Additional Information:INTRODUCTION This paper sketches out some preliminary thoughts about what it might mean to conceptualise critique as a textured and variegated cultural practice, and whether it is possible and desirable to study it as we do other cultural practices, ethnographically. I would like to begin by posing three questions, taking as a point of departure Nikolas Kompridis’ statement that in modern capitalist societies there is nothing ‘more urgent today than to resist the sense that our possibilities are contracting or that they are exhausted’ (2006: 280). First, then, is this statement true, in the broadest sense of the term? Second, if this were the case, what kind of cultural practices, what kinds of knowledge, and what ways of being with others have the effect of opening futures up rather than closing them down—and should we necessarily accept the ones that critical theorists recommend as positive goods? Finally, if we can recognise these practices in theoretical or philosophical terms, should we also try to study them in more ‘empirical’ or interpretive ways?
Keywords:critical theory, critique, everyday life
Subjects:L Social studies > L370 Social Theory
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Education
ID Code:5820
Deposited By: Sarah Amsler
Deposited On:12 Jun 2012 21:16
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:10

Repository Staff Only: item control page