Physiological correlates of simulated sprint-distance triathlon

Taylor, Danny and Smith, Mark F. and Vleck, Veronica (2011) Physiological correlates of simulated sprint-distance triathlon. In: I World Conference of Science in Triathlon, 24-26th March 2011, Alicante, Spain.

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Official URL: http://science.triathlon.org/archive/

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between simulated triathlon performance and physiological variables measured during conventional laboratory tests. Seven non-elite, competitive male triathletes completed incremental cycling and running tests in a random order, in addition to a simulated sprint-distance triathlon trial (750 m swim, 500 kJ bike, 5 km run) using a 25 m pool, an electromagnetically braked cycle ergometer and motorised treadmill. There were no significant correlations between overall performance time and either running or cycling incremental tests, however significant correlations were found between triathlon run time and both running and cycling incremental tests (Vpeak, r = -.900, p<0.05; V4mmol, r = -.822, p<0.05; Wpeak, r = -.844, p<0.05). Total simulated triathlon time was highly correlated to cycle time (r = .930, p<0.05) and mean cycling power output (r = -.956, p<0.05), whilst there was no significant correlation between either swim time or run time and overall performance time. For non-elite, competitive male triathletes, a performance assessment which better reflects the demands of the cycle phase of triathlon (i.e. a time-trial protocol) may provide a better indication of simulated sprint-distance triathlon performance in comparison to commonly used incremental laboratory tests. Furthermore, cycling performance appears more important to overall performance in simulated sprint-distance triathlon than swimming or running.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Presentation)
Additional Information:The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between simulated triathlon performance and physiological variables measured during conventional laboratory tests. Seven non-elite, competitive male triathletes completed incremental cycling and running tests in a random order, in addition to a simulated sprint-distance triathlon trial (750 m swim, 500 kJ bike, 5 km run) using a 25 m pool, an electromagnetically braked cycle ergometer and motorised treadmill. There were no significant correlations between overall performance time and either running or cycling incremental tests, however significant correlations were found between triathlon run time and both running and cycling incremental tests (Vpeak, r = -.900, p<0.05; V4mmol, r = -.822, p<0.05; Wpeak, r = -.844, p<0.05). Total simulated triathlon time was highly correlated to cycle time (r = .930, p<0.05) and mean cycling power output (r = -.956, p<0.05), whilst there was no significant correlation between either swim time or run time and overall performance time. For non-elite, competitive male triathletes, a performance assessment which better reflects the demands of the cycle phase of triathlon (i.e. a time-trial protocol) may provide a better indication of simulated sprint-distance triathlon performance in comparison to commonly used incremental laboratory tests. Furthermore, cycling performance appears more important to overall performance in simulated sprint-distance triathlon than swimming or running.
Keywords:multisport, transition, constant-distance test, triathlete, triathlon, incremental test
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C600 Sports Science
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Sport and Exercise Science
ID Code:5733
Deposited By: Danny Taylor
Deposited On:31 May 2012 16:05
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:09

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