Mobilities of class and culture: enquiries into socio-economic change and patterns of cultural participation

Voase, Richard and Bull, Adrian (2010) Mobilities of class and culture: enquiries into socio-economic change and patterns of cultural participation. In: Great Expectations: Arts and the Future, Sixth Midterm Conference of the European Sociological Association’s Research Network for the Sociology of the Arts, 1-3 September 2010, University of Surrey.

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Abstract

Secondary research reveals that, in the United Kingdom, national shifts in the sizes of key socio-economic groups have been substantial. The numbers in the AB (professional and managerial) groups in the population have increased from 8.1m in 1992, to 11.6m in 2003, to 12.8m in 2007. This is complemented by a reduction in the C2D (manual) groups, a fact unrecognised by some public initiatives to ‘widen access’.

Two research questions are addressed. First, the ABs are known to be a primary market for live drama: between 40% and 50% of audiences. To what extent is the growth of these groups reflected in audience levels for live performance? Second, to what extent is upward mobility reflected in mobility of taste? In this respect, the work resonates with the ongoing dialogues initiated by Peterson and his omnnivore/univore thesis.

Primary research has yielded data on live arts consumption from respondents living in and around the city of Lincoln, UK. This city has, in the last five years, seen its Victorian theatre complemented by the refurbishment of a municipal multi-arts venue; a new flexible theatre and concert venue on the university campus; and a Students’ Union concert venue, for popular music events, on the same campus.

Offering therefore a widening range of live arts consumption opportunities, Lincoln as a community is an interesting subject for this study.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Presentation)
Additional Information:Secondary research reveals that, in the United Kingdom, national shifts in the sizes of key socio-economic groups have been substantial. The numbers in the AB (professional and managerial) groups in the population have increased from 8.1m in 1992, to 11.6m in 2003, to 12.8m in 2007. This is complemented by a reduction in the C2D (manual) groups, a fact unrecognised by some public initiatives to ‘widen access’. Two research questions are addressed. First, the ABs are known to be a primary market for live drama: between 40% and 50% of audiences. To what extent is the growth of these groups reflected in audience levels for live performance? Second, to what extent is upward mobility reflected in mobility of taste? In this respect, the work resonates with the ongoing dialogues initiated by Peterson and his omnnivore/univore thesis. Primary research has yielded data on live arts consumption from respondents living in and around the city of Lincoln, UK. This city has, in the last five years, seen its Victorian theatre complemented by the refurbishment of a municipal multi-arts venue; a new flexible theatre and concert venue on the university campus; and a Students’ Union concert venue, for popular music events, on the same campus. Offering therefore a widening range of live arts consumption opportunities, Lincoln as a community is an interesting subject for this study.
Keywords:cultural participation, socio-economic class
Subjects:N Business and Administrative studies > N820 Event Management
Divisions:College of Social Science > Lincoln Business School
ID Code:5538
Deposited By: Richard Voase
Deposited On:14 May 2012 21:41
Last Modified:14 May 2012 21:41

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