Commercial counterurbanisation in the rural periphery

Bosworth, Gary (2011) Commercial counterurbanisation in the rural periphery. In: Regional development in Northern Europe: peripherality, marginality and border issues (regions and cities). Routledge, pp. 148-163. ISBN 0415601533

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Abstract

After rapid urban growth and industrialisation, the post-war era has seen counterurbanisation become a dominant demographic trend in the UK. The residential trends are well documented but the associated growth of rural business has attracted less attention. ‘Commercial counterurbanisation’ describes rural economic growth stimulated by inward migration. Survey data and qualitative interviews in the North East of England found that in-migrants own over half of rural microbusinesses, they are more growth-orientated and they are responsible for significant employment creation. This is not just spatial decentralisation of business activity but the outcome of diverse social and economic processes. It is also a two-stage process as the business decision may occur several years after a residential move. With this time lag, in-migrant business-owners will be influenced by different factors in different locations. The balance of local embeddedness and extra-local connectedness is thought to be critical for successful and sustainable rural development.

Item Type:Book Section
Additional Information:After rapid urban growth and industrialisation, the post-war era has seen counterurbanisation become a dominant demographic trend in the UK. The residential trends are well documented but the associated growth of rural business has attracted less attention. ‘Commercial counterurbanisation’ describes rural economic growth stimulated by inward migration. Survey data and qualitative interviews in the North East of England found that in-migrants own over half of rural microbusinesses, they are more growth-orientated and they are responsible for significant employment creation. This is not just spatial decentralisation of business activity but the outcome of diverse social and economic processes. It is also a two-stage process as the business decision may occur several years after a residential move. With this time lag, in-migrant business-owners will be influenced by different factors in different locations. The balance of local embeddedness and extra-local connectedness is thought to be critical for successful and sustainable rural development.
Keywords:Counterurbanisation, Rural Periphery, Rural Development
Subjects:L Social studies > L721 Economic Geography
L Social studies > L700 Human and Social Geography
Divisions:College of Social Science > Lincoln Business School
ID Code:5475
Deposited By: Gary Bosworth
Deposited On:08 May 2012 16:23
Last Modified:08 May 2012 16:23

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