NMR spectroscopy: current status and future possibilities

Gadian, D. G. and Williams, S. R. and Bates, T. E. and Kauppinen, R. A. (1993) NMR spectroscopy: current status and future possibilities. Acta neurochirurgica. Supplementum, 57 . pp. 1-8. ISSN 0065-1419

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Official URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8421944

Abstract

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is now established as a non-invasive method of studying metabolism in living systems, ranging from cellular suspensions to man. With respect to clinical applications, recent developments include the successful implementation of new techniques for spatial localisation, and in particular the acquisition of excellent 1H spectra from selected regions of the human brain. Localised 1H spectroscopy opens the way to monitoring a wide range of compounds that are inaccessible to 31P NMR, and should add considerably to the information that is available from 31P studies. NMR spectroscopy does, however, have its limitations, which arise primarily from the fact that it is an insensitive technique. This lack of sensitivity limits the spatial resolution for metabolic studies, and means that metabolites must be present at fairly high concentrations in order to produce detectable signals. In this article, we illustrate the scope and limitations of NMR spectroscopy by describing a few examples of studies undertaken on animals and humans.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is now established as a non-invasive method of studying metabolism in living systems, ranging from cellular suspensions to man. With respect to clinical applications, recent developments include the successful implementation of new techniques for spatial localisation, and in particular the acquisition of excellent 1H spectra from selected regions of the human brain. Localised 1H spectroscopy opens the way to monitoring a wide range of compounds that are inaccessible to 31P NMR, and should add considerably to the information that is available from 31P studies. NMR spectroscopy does, however, have its limitations, which arise primarily from the fact that it is an insensitive technique. This lack of sensitivity limits the spatial resolution for metabolic studies, and means that metabolites must be present at fairly high concentrations in order to produce detectable signals. In this article, we illustrate the scope and limitations of NMR spectroscopy by describing a few examples of studies undertaken on animals and humans.
Keywords:NMR Spectroscopy
Subjects:A Medicine and Dentistry > A100 Pre-clinical Medicine
A Medicine and Dentistry > A300 Clinical Medicine
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
ID Code:5374
Deposited By: Timothy Bates
Deposited On:17 May 2012 17:30
Last Modified:17 May 2012 17:30

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