Experimental methods in health research

Siriwardena, A. Niroshan (2007) Experimental methods in health research. In: Researching health: qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods. Sage , London, pp. 246-264. ISBN 9781412903639, 9781412903646

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Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of experimental and quasi-experimental methods with a particular focus on experimental techniques that provide alternatives to the randomized controlled study which is, in effect in terms of the hierarchy of evidence described in Chapter 3, a particularly form of experimental method. The principles of the double blind controlled trial, where randomization can control for confounding variables and double-blinding can reduce certain types of bias, have been described in the previous chapter. However, it is not always possible to conduct an RCT for methodological, practical and ethical reasons that are discussed below. What are broadly termed experimental methods, an umbrella term that includes a wide variety of particular techniques, aim to maintain scientific rigour in situations where it is not possible to set up controls. The chapter will explain the language of experimentation and discuss the advantages and disadvantages, as well as how such methods should be applied. A range of experimental research designs based on published or unpublished studies are described to illustrate the use of this method in practice.

Item Type:Book Section
Additional Information:This chapter provides an overview of experimental and quasi-experimental methods with a particular focus on experimental techniques that provide alternatives to the randomized controlled study which is, in effect in terms of the hierarchy of evidence described in Chapter 3, a particularly form of experimental method. The principles of the double blind controlled trial, where randomization can control for confounding variables and double-blinding can reduce certain types of bias, have been described in the previous chapter. However, it is not always possible to conduct an RCT for methodological, practical and ethical reasons that are discussed below. What are broadly termed experimental methods, an umbrella term that includes a wide variety of particular techniques, aim to maintain scientific rigour in situations where it is not possible to set up controls. The chapter will explain the language of experimentation and discuss the advantages and disadvantages, as well as how such methods should be applied. A range of experimental research designs based on published or unpublished studies are described to illustrate the use of this method in practice.
Keywords:experimental methods, research methods
Subjects:B Subjects allied to Medicine > B990 Subjects Allied to Medicine not elsewhere classified
A Medicine and Dentistry > A300 Clinical Medicine
B Subjects allied to Medicine > B700 Nursing
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Health & Social Care
ID Code:5180
Deposited By: Niro Siriwardena
Deposited On:05 May 2012 13:03
Last Modified:08 May 2012 18:42

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