International legal implications of climate change for the polar regions: "too much, too little, too late"?

French, Duncan and Scott, Karen (2009) International legal implications of climate change for the polar regions: "too much, too little, too late"? Melbourne Journal of International Law, 10 (2). pp. 631-654. ISSN 1444-8602

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Official URL: http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/journals/MelbJIL/2009...

Abstract

Climate change is by definition both a global and a regional issue. Perhaps this paradox is most evident in the polar regions where regional change and global impact coexist. This paper does not deny the importance of the global climate change regime, but opts instead to consider the role of those institutions which can most affect the particularities of the polar context, namely the Arctic Council and the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meetings. The original perception that climate change is not an issue which can be addressed regionally is slowely beginning to change. There are (at least) three areas where action can be taken by polar states: mitigation, adaptation and representation. Despite recent scientific and policy initiatives however, climate change remains under-regulated in the polar regions. Thus, there is too much rhetoric and too little regulation. Unfortunately, before we get a chance to resolve this conundrum, the global reality may overtake the normative endeavour; ie. it may also be too late.

Item Type:Article
Keywords:climate change, polar regions, Antarctica, Arctic, adaptation
Subjects:M Law > M130 Public International Law
Divisions:College of Social Science > Lincoln Law School
ID Code:5175
Deposited By: Duncan French
Deposited On:08 May 2012 16:17
Last Modified:11 Jun 2014 14:15

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