Edge condition: tracing the negative chain reaction resulting from the construction of the wall in Qalqilya, Palestine

Elvin, Rosie (2012) Edge condition: tracing the negative chain reaction resulting from the construction of the wall in Qalqilya, Palestine. In: Theoretical Currents II: Architecture and its Geographical Horizons, 4-5 April 2012, University of Lincoln.

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Abstract

Abstract
Theoretical Currents II: Architecture and its Geographical Horizons
Edge Condition
The construction of the separation barrier in The West Bank has had an enormous impact on the day-to-day lives of Palestinians in Qalqilia, a town bordering Israel. Once described as ‘The West Bank’s Fruit Basket,’ serving Israel and the West Bank as an affluent market town, the people of Qalqilia are now geographically cut off from their farms, schools, universities, places of work, medical care, friends and family
Qalqilia is unique to the West Bank, in that the separation barrier surrounding the town is made entirely of concrete sections, with no fences allowing views of the landscape. It is a Palestinian policed city, with one entrance and exit, guarded by Israeli soldiers. The road leading in to the town is often closed, or blocked causing traffic congestion
The negative chain reaction that has resulted from the construction of the wall can be seen in the visual interruption of the landscape, the sharp rise in unemployment, shop closures and the shrinking market size
This paper explores the construction of the wall, documenting the structures and defence mechanisms. The networks and the logistics of occupation and disruption are visually represented with diagrammatical maps and collages. The work expresses the negative chain reaction the wall has had on individual’s lives in Qalqilia, including the farmer’s separation from their land and the shrinking of The West Bank

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Additional Information:Abstract Theoretical Currents II: Architecture and its Geographical Horizons Edge Condition The construction of the separation barrier in The West Bank has had an enormous impact on the day-to-day lives of Palestinians in Qalqilia, a town bordering Israel. Once described as ‘The West Bank’s Fruit Basket,’ serving Israel and the West Bank as an affluent market town, the people of Qalqilia are now geographically cut off from their farms, schools, universities, places of work, medical care, friends and family Qalqilia is unique to the West Bank, in that the separation barrier surrounding the town is made entirely of concrete sections, with no fences allowing views of the landscape. It is a Palestinian policed city, with one entrance and exit, guarded by Israeli soldiers. The road leading in to the town is often closed, or blocked causing traffic congestion The negative chain reaction that has resulted from the construction of the wall can be seen in the visual interruption of the landscape, the sharp rise in unemployment, shop closures and the shrinking market size This paper explores the construction of the wall, documenting the structures and defence mechanisms. The networks and the logistics of occupation and disruption are visually represented with diagrammatical maps and collages. The work expresses the negative chain reaction the wall has had on individual’s lives in Qalqilia, including the farmer’s separation from their land and the shrinking of The West Bank
Keywords:Palestine
Subjects:K Architecture, Building and Planning > K110 Architectural Design Theory
Divisions:College of Arts > Lincoln School of Art & Design
ID Code:5115
Deposited By: Rosie Elvin
Deposited On:27 Apr 2012 21:35
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:06

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