Evaluating the use of bioremediation techniques in the conservation of hydrocarbon-contaminated stone monuments

Kliafa, Maria and Colston, Belinda and Watt, David (2003) Evaluating the use of bioremediation techniques in the conservation of hydrocarbon-contaminated stone monuments. In: Conservation Science 2002. Archetype, London, pp. 135-140. ISBN 1873132883

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Abstract

Many stone monuments are found in soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, which are either subject to continuous pollution or polluted as a result of an accident. This may affect the appearance of the monument
or its setting and has the potential to affect the physical properties and durability of the buried parts. Bioremediation is a method commonly used to treat hydrocarbon-contaminated soil and is thus considered to be a
potential remedial technique for those monuments. It is based on utilising indigenous microbial populations to alter
permanently the chemical composition of the contaminants. The likely efficacy of bioremediation involves a consideration of the characteristics of the stone, bioremediation parameters, health and safety, the long-term effects of the technique(s), cost and effectiveness. Bioventing, a bioremediation process based in aerating soils, is considered to be a suitable method for treating these hydrocarbon-contaminated stones and has been experimentally assessed. Interim results are presented.

Item Type:Book Section
Additional Information:Many stone monuments are found in soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, which are either subject to continuous pollution or polluted as a result of an accident. This may affect the appearance of the monument or its setting and has the potential to affect the physical properties and durability of the buried parts. Bioremediation is a method commonly used to treat hydrocarbon-contaminated soil and is thus considered to be a potential remedial technique for those monuments. It is based on utilising indigenous microbial populations to alter permanently the chemical composition of the contaminants. The likely efficacy of bioremediation involves a consideration of the characteristics of the stone, bioremediation parameters, health and safety, the long-term effects of the technique(s), cost and effectiveness. Bioventing, a bioremediation process based in aerating soils, is considered to be a suitable method for treating these hydrocarbon-contaminated stones and has been experimentally assessed. Interim results are presented.
Keywords:stone monuments, conservation, pollution, bioremediation, hydrocarbons, bmjtype
Subjects:F Physical Sciences > F200 Materials Science
F Physical Sciences > F110 Applied Chemistry
C Biological Sciences > C560 Biotechnology
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
ID Code:5101
Deposited By: Belinda Colston
Deposited On:26 Apr 2012 16:12
Last Modified:26 Apr 2012 16:16

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