Landscape and genre in the Caribbean canon: a poetics of place and paradise

Burns, Lorna (2008) Landscape and genre in the Caribbean canon: a poetics of place and paradise. Journal of West Indian Literature, 17 (1). pp. 20-37. ISSN 0258-8501

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Abstract

This paper traces the impulse to identify the Caribbean landscape with paradisiacal or Edenic imagery from the foundational texts of the Caribbean canon, such as James Grainger's The Sugar Cane (1764) and works by the pre-1930s poets J. E. Clare McFarlane, Tom Redcam, H. S. Bunbury, which clearly proclaim their affinity to the European perspective that sought to erase the hardships of plantation life by evoking the lazy languor of life in the tropics, through to the forceful appraisal of the idealising gaze of the coloniser/tourist in the poems of Una Marson and Aimé Césaire.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:This paper traces the impulse to identify the Caribbean landscape with paradisiacal or Edenic imagery from the foundational texts of the Caribbean canon, such as James Grainger's The Sugar Cane (1764) and works by the pre-1930s poets J. E. Clare McFarlane, Tom Redcam, H. S. Bunbury, which clearly proclaim their affinity to the European perspective that sought to erase the hardships of plantation life by evoking the lazy languor of life in the tropics, through to the forceful appraisal of the idealising gaze of the coloniser/tourist in the poems of Una Marson and Aimé Césaire.
Keywords:Caribbean poetry, James Grainger, Una Marson, Aime Cesaire, environment and literature
Subjects:Q Linguistics, Classics and related subjects > Q320 English Literature
Divisions:College of Arts > Lincoln School of Humanities
ID Code:5009
Deposited By:INVALID USER
Deposited On:03 Apr 2012 18:03
Last Modified:03 Apr 2012 18:03

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