Becoming-Bertha: virtual difference and repetition in postcolonial ‘writing back’, a Deleuzian reading of Jean Rhys’s "Wide Sargasso Sea"

Burns, Lorna (2010) Becoming-Bertha: virtual difference and repetition in postcolonial ‘writing back’, a Deleuzian reading of Jean Rhys’s "Wide Sargasso Sea". Deleuze Studies, 4 (1). pp. 16-41. ISSN 1750-2241

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/E1750224110000784

Abstract

Critical responses to Wide Sargasso Sea have seized upon Rhys's novel as an exemplary model of writing back. Looking beyond the actual repetitions which recall Brontë’s text, I explore Rhys's novel as an expression of virtual difference and becomings that exemplify Deleuze's three syntheses of time. Elaborating the processes of becoming that Deleuze's third synthesis depicts, Antoinette's fate emerges not as a violence against an original identity. Rather, what the reader witnesses is a series of becomings or masks, some of which are validated, some of which are not, and it is in the rejection of certain masks, forcing Antoinette to become-Bertha, that the greatest violence lies.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Critical responses to Wide Sargasso Sea have seized upon Rhys's novel as an exemplary model of writing back. Looking beyond the actual repetitions which recall Brontë’s text, I explore Rhys's novel as an expression of virtual difference and becomings that exemplify Deleuze's three syntheses of time. Elaborating the processes of becoming that Deleuze's third synthesis depicts, Antoinette's fate emerges not as a violence against an original identity. Rather, what the reader witnesses is a series of becomings or masks, some of which are validated, some of which are not, and it is in the rejection of certain masks, forcing Antoinette to become-Bertha, that the greatest violence lies.
Keywords:Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea, Gilles Deleuze, postcolonial
Subjects:Q Linguistics, Classics and related subjects > Q320 English Literature
V Historical and Philosophical studies > V500 Philosophy
Divisions:College of Arts > Lincoln School of Humanities
ID Code:5000
Deposited By:INVALID USER
Deposited On:04 Apr 2012 20:51
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:05

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