Two-stroke: a new illusion of visual motion based on the time course of neural responses in the human visual system

Mather, George (2006) Two-stroke: a new illusion of visual motion based on the time course of neural responses in the human visual system. Vision Research, 46 (13). pp. 2015-2018. ISSN 0042-6989

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Two-stroke: a new illusion of visual motion based on the time course of neural responses in the human visual system
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Abstract

A sequence of static images presented in rapid succession can create a powerful impression of visual movement, a fact exploited by the visual media (television and cinema) and by animators. A new illusion of movement called ‘‘two-stroke’’ is described, in which repeated presentation of a two-frame pattern displacement can create an impression of continuous forward motion, without the inclusion of any
additional pattern displacements. The illusion can be explained by a biphasic temporal impulse response that modifies the stimulus delivered to motion energy sensors. It offers a basis for further research on temporal and motion responses in the visual system as well as a
tool for animators and graphic artists to create consistent apparent movement from minimal external stimulation.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:A sequence of static images presented in rapid succession can create a powerful impression of visual movement, a fact exploited by the visual media (television and cinema) and by animators. A new illusion of movement called ‘‘two-stroke’’ is described, in which repeated presentation of a two-frame pattern displacement can create an impression of continuous forward motion, without the inclusion of any additional pattern displacements. The illusion can be explained by a biphasic temporal impulse response that modifies the stimulus delivered to motion energy sensors. It offers a basis for further research on temporal and motion responses in the visual system as well as a tool for animators and graphic artists to create consistent apparent movement from minimal external stimulation.
Keywords:Motion perception, Illusion, Apparent motion, Motion detection
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C850 Cognitive Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:4731
Deposited By: Alison Wilson
Deposited On:13 Oct 2011 12:23
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:02

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