A comprehensive evaluation of motion sensor step counting error

Abel, M. G. and Peritore, N. and Shapiro, R. and Mullineaux, David and Rodriguez, K. and Hannon, J. C. (2011) A comprehensive evaluation of motion sensor step counting error. Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism , 36 (1). pp. 166-170. ISSN 1715-5312

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A comprehensive evaluation of motion sensor step counting error
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the effect that walking speed, gender,
leg length, motion sensor tilt angle, brand, and placement have on motion sensor step-counting error. Fifty-nine participants performed treadmill walking trials at 6 speeds while wearing 5 motion sensor brands placed on the anterior (Digiwalker,DW; Walk4Life, WFL; New Lifestyles, NL; Omron, OM), midaxillary (DW; WFL; NL; ActiGraph, AG), and
posterior (DW, WFL, NL) aspects of the waistline. The anterior-placed NL and midaxillary-placed AG were the most accurate motion sensors. Motion sensor step-count error tended to decrease at faster walking speeds, with lesser tilt angles,and with an anterior waistline placement. Gender and leg length had no effect on motion sensor step-count error. We conclude that the NL and AG yielded the most accurate step counts at a range of walking speeds in individuals with different physical characteristics.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:The purpose of this study was to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the effect that walking speed, gender, leg length, motion sensor tilt angle, brand, and placement have on motion sensor step-counting error. Fifty-nine participants performed treadmill walking trials at 6 speeds while wearing 5 motion sensor brands placed on the anterior (Digiwalker,DW; Walk4Life, WFL; New Lifestyles, NL; Omron, OM), midaxillary (DW; WFL; NL; ActiGraph, AG), and posterior (DW, WFL, NL) aspects of the waistline. The anterior-placed NL and midaxillary-placed AG were the most accurate motion sensors. Motion sensor step-count error tended to decrease at faster walking speeds, with lesser tilt angles,and with an anterior waistline placement. Gender and leg length had no effect on motion sensor step-count error. We conclude that the NL and AG yielded the most accurate step counts at a range of walking speeds in individuals with different physical characteristics.
Keywords:accelerometer, measurement, motion sensor, pedometer, walking
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C600 Sports Science
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Sport and Exercise Science
ID Code:4712
Deposited By: Alison Wilson
Deposited On:07 Oct 2011 21:05
Last Modified:04 Dec 2013 20:57

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