Tails of animal attraction: incorporating the feline into the family

Downey, Hilary and Ellis, Sarah (2008) Tails of animal attraction: incorporating the feline into the family. Journal of Business Research, 61 (5). pp. 434-441. ISSN 0148-2963

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Abstract

Increased urbanization and female employment have led to the cat overtaking the dog as the companion animal of preference. However, this
article looks beyond lifestyle changes as reasons for the popularity of the cat. The article explores the emotional consumer-socialization process
involving the incorporation of the cat into the family. Subjective personal introspection (SPI) and supporting vignettes of female humans in their
families (all of which were high-involvement owners) explore the hows and whys of feline incorporation. The study identifies several categories of
incorporation. The findings suggest that this complex process involves many factors — namely, consumer socialization, intergenerational
influence, brand loyalty, commitment, near-instant loyalty, immediacy, distress, anthropomorphism, and nostalgia. These factors underpin the
intimacy and care the human–feline relationship expresses. The ability for humans and cats to bond in a way that fosters emotional intimacy can
be considered one of the purest forms of relationships.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Increased urbanization and female employment have led to the cat overtaking the dog as the companion animal of preference. However, this article looks beyond lifestyle changes as reasons for the popularity of the cat. The article explores the emotional consumer-socialization process involving the incorporation of the cat into the family. Subjective personal introspection (SPI) and supporting vignettes of female humans in their families (all of which were high-involvement owners) explore the hows and whys of feline incorporation. The study identifies several categories of incorporation. The findings suggest that this complex process involves many factors — namely, consumer socialization, intergenerational influence, brand loyalty, commitment, near-instant loyalty, immediacy, distress, anthropomorphism, and nostalgia. These factors underpin the intimacy and care the human–feline relationship expresses. The ability for humans and cats to bond in a way that fosters emotional intimacy can be considered one of the purest forms of relationships.
Keywords:Human-animal bonding, Cat, brand-loyalty, Consumer socialization;, Intergenerational influences, Pure relationship
Subjects:D Veterinary Sciences, Agriculture and related subjects > D300 Animal Science
D Veterinary Sciences, Agriculture and related subjects > D328 Animal Welfare
Divisions:College of Science > School of Life Sciences
ID Code:4659
Deposited By: Sarah Ellis
Deposited On:14 Sep 2011 17:30
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:02

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