Formation and diagnostics of sprays in combustion

Meyer, Terrence and Brear, Michael and Jin, Seong-Ho and Gord, James (2010) Formation and diagnostics of sprays in combustion. In: Handbook of combustion. Wiley. ISBN 9783527324491

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Abstract

Fuel-air mixture preparation is a key factor determining combustion performance and emissions in a variety of practical applications, such as internal combustion engines,
gas-turbine engines, rocket propulsion devices, and power generation systems. The problem of characterizing the two-phase combustion process, however, is quite difficult
in part because of the complex optical interactions involved, as well as the optically dense nature of many sprays. There are a wide number of techniques currently
employed for the characterization of spray combustion processes, with the selection of appropriate measurement technology dependent upon the nature of the spray for each
combustion application. This chapter reviews a variety of conventional techniques, in particular Mie scattering, phase-Doppler interferometry, and planar laser-induced
fluorescence. More advanced techniques, including holography, three-dimensional tomography, X-ray radiography, and time-gated ballistic imaging are also discussed. Often the combination or comparison of multiple techniques yields information that would otherwise be inaccessible with individual methods. Advantages and
disadvantages of each technique, sources of error, measurement needs, and outlook for future development are discussed in the context of the challenges facing combustion
scientists and engineers.

Item Type:Book Section
Additional Information:Fuel-air mixture preparation is a key factor determining combustion performance and emissions in a variety of practical applications, such as internal combustion engines, gas-turbine engines, rocket propulsion devices, and power generation systems. The problem of characterizing the two-phase combustion process, however, is quite difficult in part because of the complex optical interactions involved, as well as the optically dense nature of many sprays. There are a wide number of techniques currently employed for the characterization of spray combustion processes, with the selection of appropriate measurement technology dependent upon the nature of the spray for each combustion application. This chapter reviews a variety of conventional techniques, in particular Mie scattering, phase-Doppler interferometry, and planar laser-induced fluorescence. More advanced techniques, including holography, three-dimensional tomography, X-ray radiography, and time-gated ballistic imaging are also discussed. Often the combination or comparison of multiple techniques yields information that would otherwise be inaccessible with individual methods. Advantages and disadvantages of each technique, sources of error, measurement needs, and outlook for future development are discussed in the context of the challenges facing combustion scientists and engineers.
Keywords:Diagnostics, Spray, Combustion
Subjects:H Engineering > H141 Fluid Mechanics
H Engineering > H311 Thermodynamics
Divisions:College of Science > School of Engineering
ID Code:4622
Deposited By: Seong-Ho Jin
Deposited On:20 Aug 2011 07:46
Last Modified:02 Sep 2014 09:13

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