Carbon cutting: socially mediated energy reductions in the workplace

Foster, Derek (2011) Carbon cutting: socially mediated energy reductions in the workplace. Interfaces Magazine (87). pp. 22-23. ISSN 1351-119x

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Abstract

The responsible consumption of energy in both domestic and workplace environments is a contemporary issue of considerable importance. It is generally acknowledged amongst scientists and, increasingly, politicians and corporations that current levels of energy consumption are not sustainable. A recent report has indicated that if the 17 million UK workers who regularly use a desktop PC powered it off at night this would reduce CO2 emissions by 1.3 million tons - the equivalent of removing 245,000 cars from the road. The UK’s commercial and services sector, which covers education, is responsible for 12% of the UK’s total energy consumption. Therefore, despite public sector governmental carbon policies coming to the fore, there is still much to gain by exploring new ways of persuading people to adopt positive energy usage behaviour whilst at work.

The big-picture value to successful research endeavours such as this are very real with cascading benefits - by reducing Co2 emissions we can reduce the environmental impact, constrain energy shortages and limit the incumbent economic repercussions. The contribution to the HCI domain is an understanding of how we can effectively incorporate sustainable ideals and timely feedback into social media technologies, thereby motivating positive behaviour change in institutional energy consumption.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:The responsible consumption of energy in both domestic and workplace environments is a contemporary issue of considerable importance. It is generally acknowledged amongst scientists and, increasingly, politicians and corporations that current levels of energy consumption are not sustainable. A recent report has indicated that if the 17 million UK workers who regularly use a desktop PC powered it off at night this would reduce CO2 emissions by 1.3 million tons - the equivalent of removing 245,000 cars from the road. The UK’s commercial and services sector, which covers education, is responsible for 12% of the UK’s total energy consumption. Therefore, despite public sector governmental carbon policies coming to the fore, there is still much to gain by exploring new ways of persuading people to adopt positive energy usage behaviour whilst at work. The big-picture value to successful research endeavours such as this are very real with cascading benefits - by reducing Co2 emissions we can reduce the environmental impact, constrain energy shortages and limit the incumbent economic repercussions. The contribution to the HCI domain is an understanding of how we can effectively incorporate sustainable ideals and timely feedback into social media technologies, thereby motivating positive behaviour change in institutional energy consumption.
Keywords:energy, carbon, organisation, behaviour change, sustainability, HCI
Subjects:G Mathematical and Computer Sciences > G400 Computer Science
G Mathematical and Computer Sciences > G440 Human-computer Interaction
Divisions:College of Science > School of Computer Science
ID Code:4568
Deposited By: Derek Foster
Deposited On:06 Jul 2011 06:22
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 09:01

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