The usefulness of social capital in assessing the welfare effects of private and third-party certification food safety policy standards: trust and networks

Sodano, Valeria and Hingley, Martin and Lindgreen, Adam (2008) The usefulness of social capital in assessing the welfare effects of private and third-party certification food safety policy standards: trust and networks. British Food Journal, 110 (4/5). pp. 493-513. ISSN 0007-070X

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/00070700810868988

Abstract

Purpose – The aim of this paper is to assess the welfare effects of the newest trends in food safety policies characterised by the shift from public to private intervention.

Design/methodology/approach – Food safety policies are analysed through concepts of new economic sociology, with a critical review of the literature on social capital.

Findings – The article shows that as food safety and quality attributes responsible for the exchange complexity are simply codified and enforced through standards and third-party certification, the global value chain governance shifts from a relational type to a power-based type, with possible negative welfare effects.

Research limitations/implications – Further research would be required to verify the welfare effects suggested on the theoretical ground.

Practical implications – The article makes a useful updating of food safety policies and organisational innovation in the food system.

Originality/value – The paper introduces some new (with respect to the marketing literature related to the food system) concepts and theories of economic sociology.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Purpose – The aim of this paper is to assess the welfare effects of the newest trends in food safety policies characterised by the shift from public to private intervention. Design/methodology/approach – Food safety policies are analysed through concepts of new economic sociology, with a critical review of the literature on social capital. Findings – The article shows that as food safety and quality attributes responsible for the exchange complexity are simply codified and enforced through standards and third-party certification, the global value chain governance shifts from a relational type to a power-based type, with possible negative welfare effects. Research limitations/implications – Further research would be required to verify the welfare effects suggested on the theoretical ground. Practical implications – The article makes a useful updating of food safety policies and organisational innovation in the food system. Originality/value – The paper introduces some new (with respect to the marketing literature related to the food system) concepts and theories of economic sociology.
Keywords:Food safety, Product management, Social capital, Standards, Trust
Subjects:D Veterinary Sciences, Agriculture and related subjects > D600 Food and Beverage studies
L Social studies > L110 Applied Economics
D Veterinary Sciences, Agriculture and related subjects > D640 Food and Beverages for the Consumer
Divisions:College of Social Science > Lincoln Business School
ID Code:4254
Deposited By: Rosaline Smith
Deposited On:21 Mar 2011 14:38
Last Modified:18 Jul 2011 16:39

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