Ethnic opportunities: the emergence of new supply chains that stimulate and respond to the need for 'new' ingredients

Beer, Sean and Hingley, Martin and Lindgreen, Adam (2009) Ethnic opportunities: the emergence of new supply chains that stimulate and respond to the need for 'new' ingredients. In: The new cultures of food: marketing opportunities from ethnic, religious and cultural diversity. Food and Agricultural Marketing . Gower Applied Research, Surrey, UK, pp. 57-72. ISBN 9780566088131

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Full text URL: http://www.gowerpublishing.com/isbn/9780566088131

Abstract

This chapter considers the approach of innovative and entrepreneurial organizations that have responded to changing circumstances (eg socio-ethnic, market demand, even climatic) to develop new products for new markets. We discuss the agents for change against a background of evolving national and regional gastronomy. From this example, we address innovation and change in food developed in various regions of the UK. Producers from two distinct regions have very different food histories and socio-economic characteristics: the South West and the West Midlands. In the South West, producers draw on a rich food heritage to adapt products to meet the demands of ethnically diversifying UK consumers; in the West Midlands (one of the already most ethnically diverse areas of the UK), rural fresh produce growers are striving to meet the challenge of change in response to the major conurbation on their doorstep. The chapter concludes with the recognition that evolving markets and regional and national gastronomies create the impetus for product innovation, but both producer and market can be hampered by channel and cultural disconnection. Actors in the processes and channels of production and supply must understand one another and unite in the service of new and emerging markets to best meet the burgeoning needs of ethically diverse customers.

Item Type:Book Section
Additional Information:This chapter considers the approach of innovative and entrepreneurial organizations that have responded to changing circumstances (eg socio-ethnic, market demand, even climatic) to develop new products for new markets. We discuss the agents for change against a background of evolving national and regional gastronomy. From this example, we address innovation and change in food developed in various regions of the UK. Producers from two distinct regions have very different food histories and socio-economic characteristics: the South West and the West Midlands. In the South West, producers draw on a rich food heritage to adapt products to meet the demands of ethnically diversifying UK consumers; in the West Midlands (one of the already most ethnically diverse areas of the UK), rural fresh produce growers are striving to meet the challenge of change in response to the major conurbation on their doorstep. The chapter concludes with the recognition that evolving markets and regional and national gastronomies create the impetus for product innovation, but both producer and market can be hampered by channel and cultural disconnection. Actors in the processes and channels of production and supply must understand one another and unite in the service of new and emerging markets to best meet the burgeoning needs of ethically diverse customers.
Keywords:ethnic markets, new food products, UK, supply and channel networks
Subjects:D Veterinary Sciences, Agriculture and related subjects > D600 Food and Beverage studies
N Business and Administrative studies > N500 Marketing
L Social studies > L330 Ethnic studies
Divisions:College of Social Science > Lincoln Business School
ID Code:4241
Deposited By: Rosaline Smith
Deposited On:18 Mar 2011 16:00
Last Modified:18 Jul 2011 16:40

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