Pediatric anthropometrics are inconsistent with current guidelines for assessing rider fit on all terrain vehicles

Bernard, A. C. and Mullineaux, David and Auxier, D. R. and Forman, J. T. and Shapiro, R. and Pienkowski, D. (2010) Pediatric anthropometrics are inconsistent with current guidelines for assessing rider fit on all terrain vehicles. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 42 (4). pp. 1220-1225. ISSN 0001-4575

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Abstract

Background/purpose: This study sought to establish objective anthropometric measures of fit or misfit for
young riders on adult and youth-sized all-terrain vehicles and use these metrics to test the unproved
historical reasoning that age alone is a sufficient measure of rider-ATV fit.
Methods: Male children (6–11 years, n = 8; and 12–15 years, n = 11) were selected by convenience sampling.
Rider-ATV fit was quantified by five measures adapted from published recommendations: (1)
standing-seat clearance, (2) hand size, (3) foot vs. foot–brake position, (4) elbow angle, and (5) handlebarto-
knee distance.
Results: Youths aged 12–15 years fit the adult-sized ATV better than the ATV Safety Institute recommended
age-appropriate youth model (63% of subjects fit all 5 measures on adult-sized ATV vs. 20% on
youth-sized ATV). Youths aged 6–11 years fit poorly on ATVs of both sizes (0% fit all 5 parameters on the
adult-sized ATV vs 12% on the youth-sized ATV).
Conclusions: The ATV Safety Institute recommends rider-ATV fit according to age and engine displacement,
but no objective data linking age or anthropometrics with ATV engine or frame size has been
previously published. Age alone is a poor predictor of rider-ATV fit; the five metrics used offer an
improvement compared to current recommendations.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Background/purpose: This study sought to establish objective anthropometric measures of fit or misfit for young riders on adult and youth-sized all-terrain vehicles and use these metrics to test the unproved historical reasoning that age alone is a sufficient measure of rider-ATV fit. Methods: Male children (6–11 years, n = 8; and 12–15 years, n = 11) were selected by convenience sampling. Rider-ATV fit was quantified by five measures adapted from published recommendations: (1) standing-seat clearance, (2) hand size, (3) foot vs. foot–brake position, (4) elbow angle, and (5) handlebarto- knee distance. Results: Youths aged 12–15 years fit the adult-sized ATV better than the ATV Safety Institute recommended age-appropriate youth model (63% of subjects fit all 5 measures on adult-sized ATV vs. 20% on youth-sized ATV). Youths aged 6–11 years fit poorly on ATVs of both sizes (0% fit all 5 parameters on the adult-sized ATV vs 12% on the youth-sized ATV). Conclusions: The ATV Safety Institute recommends rider-ATV fit according to age and engine displacement, but no objective data linking age or anthropometrics with ATV engine or frame size has been previously published. Age alone is a poor predictor of rider-ATV fit; the five metrics used offer an improvement compared to current recommendations.
Keywords:Child, Fit
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C600 Sports Science
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Sport and Exercise Science
ID Code:4219
Deposited By: Alison Wilson
Deposited On:17 Mar 2011 13:00
Last Modified:18 Nov 2013 16:03

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