Additive effects of inhibiting attention to objects and locations in three-dimensional displays

Bourke, Patrick A. and Partridge, Helen and Pollux, Petra M.J. (2006) Additive effects of inhibiting attention to objects and locations in three-dimensional displays. Visual Cognition, 13 (5). pp. 643-654. ISSN 1464-0716

Documents
uoa44pp05.pdf
[img]
[Download]
[img] PDF
uoa44pp05.pdf - Whole Document
Restricted to Repository staff only

135Kb

Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13506280544000309

Abstract

One of the processes thought to underlie visual selection works by biasing attention away from either recently examined locations or objects. The extent of this “inhibition” is greatest when the inhibited object and the inhibited location coincide. In Experiment 1, rectangles are presented stereoscopically at different depths but at similar positions horizontally and vertically. Here, any inhibition should be based solely on a spatial code, as the objects, the rectangles are clearly separate objects. In Experiment 2, the corners of the rectangles are joined to produce a single cuboid that extends in depth space. Now inhibition based on both spatial and object codes should be seen because even when on different depth planes the cue and target are associated with the same object. Consistent with our understanding of the additive effects of inhibition of space and object codes, the extent of inhibition in the second study is almost double that of the first. The results further suggest that space-based inhibition operates within a two-dimensional representation while object-based inhibition utilizes a three-dimensional representation.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:One of the processes thought to underlie visual selection works by biasing attention away from either recently examined locations or objects. The extent of this “inhibition” is greatest when the inhibited object and the inhibited location coincide. In Experiment 1, rectangles are presented stereoscopically at different depths but at similar positions horizontally and vertically. Here, any inhibition should be based solely on a spatial code, as the objects, the rectangles are clearly separate objects. In Experiment 2, the corners of the rectangles are joined to produce a single cuboid that extends in depth space. Now inhibition based on both spatial and object codes should be seen because even when on different depth planes the cue and target are associated with the same object. Consistent with our understanding of the additive effects of inhibition of space and object codes, the extent of inhibition in the second study is almost double that of the first. The results further suggest that space-based inhibition operates within a two-dimensional representation while object-based inhibition utilizes a three-dimensional representation.
Keywords:Visual image, Stimuli, Image Processing, Cognitive psychology, Visual cognition
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C800 Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C850 Cognitive Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C830 Experimental Psychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:407
Deposited By: Jill Partridge
Deposited On:30 Oct 2006
Last Modified:13 Mar 2013 08:22

Repository Staff Only: item control page