The carbon-reduction potential of straw-bale housing

Sodagar, Behzad and Deepak, Rai and Jones, Barbara and Wihan, Jakub and Fieldson, Rosi (2011) The carbon-reduction potential of straw-bale housing. Building Research & Information, 39 (1). 51 -65. ISSN 0961-3218

Documents
The_Carbon_Reduction_Potential_of_Strawbale_Housing.pdf
[img]
[Download]
The_carbon-reduction_potential_of_straw-bale_housing_-_BRI.pdf
[img]
[Download]
Request a copy
[img]
Preview
PDF
The_Carbon_Reduction_Potential_of_Strawbale_Housing.pdf - Whole Document

1MB
[img] PDF
The_carbon-reduction_potential_of_straw-bale_housing_-_BRI.pdf - Whole Document
Restricted to Repository staff only

863kB

Full text URL: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all?co...

Abstract

The role of straw bale as a construction material for reducing the whole-life impacts of housing is examined. The embodied and operational CO2 emissions in a recently completed UK social housing project are compared using alternative domestic external wall constructions and the effects on the resulting CO2 emissions. It is estimated that over 15 tonnes of CO2 may be stored in biotic materials of each of the semi-detached houses, of which around 6 tonnes are sequestered by straw and the remaining by wood and wood products. This suggests the carbon lock-up potential of renewable construction materials is capable of reducing the case study house's whole-life CO2 emissions of the house over its 60-year design life by 61% when compared with the case without sequestration. The practical implications of construction, detailing, maintenance, cost and self-build potentials of straw-bale construction are also considered. The potential for load-bearing straw-bale walls is examined through the whole-life performance of straw-bale construction with alternative conventional external walling systems.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:The role of straw bale as a construction material for reducing the whole-life impacts of housing is examined. The embodied and operational CO2 emissions in a recently completed UK social housing project are compared using alternative domestic external wall constructions and the effects on the resulting CO2 emissions. It is estimated that over 15 tonnes of CO2 may be stored in biotic materials of each of the semi-detached houses, of which around 6 tonnes are sequestered by straw and the remaining by wood and wood products. This suggests the carbon lock-up potential of renewable construction materials is capable of reducing the case study house's whole-life CO2 emissions of the house over its 60-year design life by 61% when compared with the case without sequestration. The practical implications of construction, detailing, maintenance, cost and self-build potentials of straw-bale construction are also considered. The potential for load-bearing straw-bale walls is examined through the whole-life performance of straw-bale construction with alternative conventional external walling systems.
Keywords:CO2 emissions, cost, embodied energy, operational energy, sequestered CO2, social housing, straw bale
Subjects:K Architecture, Building and Planning > K200 Building
K Architecture, Building and Planning > K210 Building Technology
K Architecture, Building and Planning > K100 Architecture
K Architecture, Building and Planning > K450 Housing
K Architecture, Building and Planning > K130 Architectural Technology
Divisions:College of Arts > Lincoln School of Architecture
ID Code:3846
Deposited By: Behzad Sodagar
Deposited On:15 Jan 2011 21:19
Last Modified:04 Dec 2013 20:55

Repository Staff Only: item control page