Laser marking titanium for contemporary jewellery

O'Hana, Sarah and Shoba, Kalsang (2010) Laser marking titanium for contemporary jewellery. In: The Shape of Science Symposium, 5 July 2010, The University of Manchester.

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Abstract

How can scientific research relate to the world of art and design?

The poster illustrates a unique and innovative PhD research project carried out by art jeweller Sarah O’Hana in the School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering. It explains how CO2 and Nd:YVO4 lasers can be used for accurate surface marking of titanium Ti 6al 4v and how applicable they are to the creation of contemporary jewellery This is the first practice-based PhD carried out in the School and relies entirely on the collaboration of art and science.

Contemporary jewellery draws much from the scientific world for inspiration but also for the delivery of research knowledge via the making of luxury and one off wearable artwork to explain processes, concepts and technological advances. The strong visual message delivered by the poster explains the morphological changes on the titanium substrate after laser processing.

The author’s production of two bracelets using laser marked titanium shows how modes of enquiry used by art cultures differ from traditional research methods with regard to personal involvement, replicability and authorship but it also highlights a shared curiosity that can generate creative energy.

In conclusion, laser controlled oxide growth on titanium can be used as an artistic tool by producing precisely defined colours. The overriding success of this work, however, is the pathway created from art practice into engineering research that has resulted in an improved communication between disciplines.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)
Additional Information:How can scientific research relate to the world of art and design? The poster illustrates a unique and innovative PhD research project carried out by art jeweller Sarah O’Hana in the School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering. It explains how CO2 and Nd:YVO4 lasers can be used for accurate surface marking of titanium Ti 6al 4v and how applicable they are to the creation of contemporary jewellery This is the first practice-based PhD carried out in the School and relies entirely on the collaboration of art and science. Contemporary jewellery draws much from the scientific world for inspiration but also for the delivery of research knowledge via the making of luxury and one off wearable artwork to explain processes, concepts and technological advances. The strong visual message delivered by the poster explains the morphological changes on the titanium substrate after laser processing. The author’s production of two bracelets using laser marked titanium shows how modes of enquiry used by art cultures differ from traditional research methods with regard to personal involvement, replicability and authorship but it also highlights a shared curiosity that can generate creative energy. In conclusion, laser controlled oxide growth on titanium can be used as an artistic tool by producing precisely defined colours. The overriding success of this work, however, is the pathway created from art practice into engineering research that has resulted in an improved communication between disciplines.
Keywords:art jewellery, titanium, laser marking, engineering research
Subjects:F Physical Sciences > F360 Optical Physics
W Creative Arts and Design > W721 Silversmithing/Goldsmithing
Divisions:College of Arts > Lincoln School of Art & Design
ID Code:3703
Deposited By: Rosaline Smith
Deposited On:16 Dec 2010 13:22
Last Modified:18 Jul 2011 16:35

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