Church, state and law: solutions to lay contumacy in the Anglo-Scottish borders during the later thirteenth century

Hoskin, Philippa (2011) Church, state and law: solutions to lay contumacy in the Anglo-Scottish borders during the later thirteenth century. Historical Research, 84 (226). pp. 559-571. ISSN 0950-3471

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2281.2011.00575.x

Abstract

This paper considers jurisdictional conflict between Church and State in the thirteenth century through the case of Roger, rector of Whitfield, a cleric abducted from his Tynedale cure. Considering this incident and Roger's attempts to gain redress it examines the jurisdictional tensions within the liberty of Tynedale, the resultant failure of the process of signification of excommunication and the use of the private petition. A close examination of the diplomatic of this early petition demonstrates both that it was drawn up under the influence of ecclesiastical administration and that this administration made tacit acknowledgement of the importance of royal grace in the exercise of secular authority to enforce ecclesiastical law. The petition is included as an appendix

Item Type:Article
Keywords:canon law, diplomatic, Tynedale, Medieval royal government, Medieval church courts, Medieval violence
Subjects:M Law > M111 English Law
V Historical and Philosophical studies > V130 Medieval History
Divisions:College of Arts > Lincoln School of Humanities
ID Code:3644
Deposited By: Philippa Hoskin
Deposited On:12 Nov 2010 12:13
Last Modified:20 Aug 2014 16:02

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