Disrupting the speech motor network: exploring hemispheric specialisation for verbal and manual sequencing using a dual-task approach

Hodgson, Jessica and Tremlin, Rachel and Hudson, John (2019) Disrupting the speech motor network: exploring hemispheric specialisation for verbal and manual sequencing using a dual-task approach. Neuropsychology . ISSN 0894-4105

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Disrupting the speech motor network: exploring hemispheric specialisation for verbal and manual sequencing using a dual-task approach
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Abstract

Objective: The concept of overlapping neural networks supporting both speech production and fine motor praxis is well accepted; however few studies explore the lateralised behavioural characteristics of language and praxis when performed simultaneously.
Method: This study probes the characteristics of the dominant hemisphere by overloading cognitive processing via a novel dual-task paradigm. Two experiments are presented where participants performed sets of motor and speech tasks under single and dual-task conditions. The sets of tasks differed on the extent to which they relied on sequential processing, with the hypothesis that tasks more reliant on this type of processing would suffer a greater performance decrement under dual-task conditions. A reliable measure of hemispheric language dominance was obtained via functional transcranial Doppler (fTCD) ultrasound.
Results: Speech production scores in the sequential processing arm were consistently impaired under dual-task conditions, a distinction not seen in the control arm. Results of experiment 2 confirm those of experiment 1, whereby speech scores were most strongly impaired under dual-task conditions and significantly more so in the experimental arm. Motor performance suffered less than speech performance in dual-task conditions over both experimental and control arms in both experiments
Conclusion: Data suggest that the common processing capacity for speech and motor praxis can be disrupted through a dual-task paradigm. This novel behavioural data supports theories suggesting a motor-based gestural origin for language and indicates that speech production is more sensitive to the effects of increased processing requirements than are motor tasks

Keywords:Speech Production, functional transcranial doppler, Lateralisation, Dual task performance, Motor skills
Subjects:C Biological Sciences > C850 Cognitive Psychology
C Biological Sciences > C860 Neuropsychology
Divisions:College of Social Science > School of Psychology
ID Code:36366
Deposited On:03 Jul 2019 13:19

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